Ubuntu-Drives

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MAYANK15031995

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My windows 7 crashed and i installed linux ubuntu 20.04 , After installation i cant see my drives ? Is my data safe ? HOw to bring drives back ? plase helpScreenshot from 2020-05-26 15-24-13.png
 

blues_harp28

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Hi, what is showing above is Ubuntu installed on all partitions. All of the hard drive.
To keep your Windows 7 and all of your files and data, when you installed Ubuntu you needed to have installed it as a dual boot system.
That is, Windows 7 on one partition of the hard drive and Ubuntu on another partition.
 
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MAYANK15031995

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Ok so does that mean I still have chance to recover my data as you said one partition have windows and other ubuntu ?
And if there is chance how can I get my data ?
 

blues_harp28

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When you were installing Ubuntu it would have asked 'do you want to install Ubuntu along side Windows 7'
If you said, Yes, Unbuntu would have made a separate partition on the hard drive to install Ubuntu onto.

From your screenshot above it is showing Ubuntu installed on the whole of the hard drive - on one partition.
During the install Ubuntu would have overwritten your Windows 7 operating system and also all files and data.
I cannot see a way to recover your data and files.
 

TerryNet

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Free data recovery programs may get a little data back. Costly data recovery programs may get a little more. Very costly data recovery services can probably get some back.
 

mohittomar13

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Linux is organised differently and directory tree starts at the root, denoted by '/'. Windows is organised around Disk Volumes and thus allows us to have different partitions. Although Linux also allows its users to have different partitions, but these partitions are only visible to the system if mounted.

You should have followed some tutorial before installing. I never suggest following the default Linux installation process as this results in the problem that you are facing. Instead, always use the 'Advanced Options' and make the required changes to the disk structure before installing the OS.

As far as recovering the data is concerned, it depends on what part of the HDD got overwritten when you installed the OS. And if the formatting was not a Quick Format then you will not be able to recover anything, unless you contact NSA :) :) .
 

MAYANK15031995

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Thanks everyone for the help .
Just one more thing . Since something like this never happens in future again with me how can i create a new drive in ubuntu jjustgor saving my data since now I have to save everything in ubuntu which have no drive !
 

TerryNet

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Hard drives can, and do, fail so any data that you care about should be saved on other media, not just on another partition on the same hard drive. Better yet, have multiple backup copies. Media include "the cloud," CD, DVD, USB flash drive and (external) hard drive.

GParted is the utility that I use in Linux distributions and, more frequently, as a standalone bootable version.
 

mohittomar13

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I totally agree with TerryNet but I suggest you make a separate "Home" partition and use the default "Root" partition. You may also want to use a separate "opt" partition. Confused?? Let me explain. :)

So like I already mentioned that the Linux file system is organised differently, you can take advantage of this difference. But how?? Well, the Home directory is where all your personal documents, images, downloads etc. resides and the Opt directory is the one where the optional software that you install is saved. You can think of it like the ProgramFiles in MS-Windows (Though its not 100% correct analogy), but yes it works somewhat similarly to ProgramFiles.

So if you make partitions for these directories then the benefit that you will get is that the next time when you install Linux your Home and Opt partitions will not be affected as you can detach these partitions from the OS and after installation, you can again reattach these to the Root directory. In fact, while installing the Linux OS you get an option to attach these partitions as directories to the newly installed OS.

I use a separate Home partition myself and never faced any problem when I do a clean install of the OS. I did it twice from Kubuntu 16.04 to Kubuntu 18.04LTS and then to Kubuntu 20.04LTS.

There are some additional steps that you need to carry out to achieve this, for example mounting the partitions when the system boots and putting entries in the fstab file.
And there are a ton of tutorials that you can find online to achieve this, so I'm not repeating those steps here.

I hope it helps.
 
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