Unable to boot Windows 10 after CHKDSK

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Allan
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The boot files are probably on the XP drive, in the first partition. It should not be a problem.
Go into the Bios and make the XP drive first in the hard drive boot device list, then it should boot to the OS selection screen in your picture each time. When you select 'Earlier version of windows' from there it will restart and boot into XP, this is normal.

Let me know how that goes, if it works ok we can then look at why there are 2 Windows 10 choices and fix that.
 

rdkapp

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Interesting, as in this screen shot?

1590792547394.png

But, where is the Recovery partition?

I can't make the BIOS adjustment just yet as I'm running a scan on the Win 10 drive, to make sure there are no issues with it. I don't think there are, but with the error message on boot and Macboatmaster's suggestion previously in the thread, I thought it was a good idea to do so.

I wonder . . . if I had done the install with all other drives disconnected, it would've installed 10 in the normal course with the Boot partition and the Recovery partition on C:, correct? And then, if I connected the XP drive, I could still dual boot through F12 and "Select a Boot First Device," correct? Wouldn't that have been a more traditional set up? I bring this up, only because the C: drive is 95% full. It's been 90%+ full for awhile as I no longer save to it, but isn't 95% a concern?

The disk scan is done. No errors shown. I will reboot now and make adjustments to the BIOS.
 

rdkapp

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The boot files are probably on the XP drive, in the first partition. It should not be a problem.
Go into the Bios and make the XP drive first in the hard drive boot device list, then it should boot to the OS selection screen in your picture each time. When you select 'Earlier version of windows' from there it will restart and boot into XP, this is normal.

Let me know how that goes, if it works ok we can then look at why there are 2 Windows 10 choices and fix that.
Yes, that is exactly what it does. I rebooted several times alternating between 10 and XP. I never received the "DISK BOOT FAILURE" error.

Could you please reply to the following questions from my previous post?
But, where is the Recovery partition?
I wonder . . . if I had done the install with all other drives disconnected, it would've installed 10 in the normal course with the Boot partition and the Recovery partition on C:, correct? And then, if I connected the XP drive, I could still dual boot through F12 and "Select a Boot First Device," correct? Wouldn't that have been a more traditional set up? I bring this up, only because the C: drive is 95% full. It's been 90%+ full for awhile as I no longer save to it, but isn't 95% a concern?
 
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managed

Allan
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Doesn't seem to be a 'Recovery' partition, I assume it doesn't make one when installed that way.

Yes but then you would have had to set up the dual-boot for XP manually, I thought it was better to let the Windows 10 install do it. This way you don't need to go into the Bios to change the OS.

No it's more usual to do it the way you just did, the advise from Microsoft is to install the older version of Windows first then the newer one, that way you get the dual-boot menu like you have now.

To remove the extra Windows 10 option in the menu please install this :- https://neosmart.net/EasyBCD/
Get the free version, click on the Register button, you can leave the Email section blank if you like.
Install it and let it start, on the View tab make it's window full screen and post a screenshot please.
 

rdkapp

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No it's more usual to do it the way you just did, the advise from Microsoft is to install the older version of Windows first then the newer one, that way you get the dual-boot menu like you have now.
Thanks for the responses. I will check out the link to remove the extra Windows 10 option in the menu a little later.

After posting, I thought about deleting "Wouldn't that have been a more traditional set up?," however, I figured you had already read it. When I thought more about it, I'm sure most people install a dual boot on the same physical drive in a separate partition, so that would be the more usual/traditional install.

Is the lack of a Recovery partition a concern? I think I've used a Recovery partition on a laptop once, but other than that, I've never used it. So, I've always thought it was sort of a waste of space. I'd like to know your thoughts.

Do you have any concerns about the 95% full drive? I went to defrag it (it's spinner), but it recommends against it as it needs at least 15% free space.
 

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Allan
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The Recovery partition is put there by the computer maker so you can go back to the 'as new' state of the OS plus any programs the maker put on, like trials of AV software etc.
You can make an 'image' yourself that will do a similar thing, it's best to install any software you want to use and set up windows the way you like it first, then I can help you do that if you want to.

It's not a great problem if the data drive is nearly full, it could slow it down though and it would be better if you could move some of the stuff on it to another drive. Best not to defrag it, it won't make much difference and could take a very long time.
Maybe you could get an external drive and put some of the data onto that ?
 

rdkapp

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The Recovery partition is put there by the computer maker so you can go back to the 'as new' state of the OS plus any programs the maker put on, like trials of AV software etc.
Yes, I get that, but I built my newest computer in Feb 2020 and installed Win 10 from the same ISO install disk as I just used on the troubled computer. Thus, it wasn't a store bought computer and it created a Recovery partition.

1590800741063.png

The above is why I'm confused about the missing Recovery partition.

You can make an 'image' yourself that will do a similar thing, it's best to install any software you want to use and set up windows the way you like it first, then I can help you do that if you want to.
Yes, I may be interested in doing that. At some point awhile back, I believe I read about doing that, but never put it into action (story of my life :)). Anyway, one of the things I've learned from this experience is that you can never have enough USB flash drives. I've got quite a few but they all have data on them and it would take a while to go through them and create some blank ones. They're cheap enough (at least the 4 GB and 8 GB ones) that I should just buy a few.

It's not a great problem if the data drive is nearly full, it could slow it down though and it would be better if you could move some of the stuff on it to another drive. Best not to defrag it, it won't make much difference and could take a very long time.
Maybe you could get an external drive and put some of the data onto that ?
That nearly full drive is the XP OS drive, so it doesn't just contain old data, but it has the OS and Programs too. I've got plenty of external storage. I have a 4 x 4 TB NAS in a raid 5 that I recently set up. I just haven't figured out a setup and method (for the data transfer from all my systems and hard drives laying around the house) for it, as well as a way to back it up. Again, story of my life ;).
 

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Allan
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Ah well, that Recovery partition is created when you install 10 onto an empty drive, it is described well here :-
https://www.diskpart.com/windows-10/recovery-partition-after-upgrading-to-windows-10-4348.html

I do get confused about which drive is which. I think you should consider dumping XP and just using 10, XP is very insecure if you go online and it's getting harder to find programs that still work in it.

Imaging is very easy once you get into it, it's often quicker to restore an image than to install an OS.
 

rdkapp

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I think you should consider dumping XP and just using 10, XP is very insecure if you go online and it's getting harder to find programs that still work in it.
I've thought about that, but there are a couple of reasons I want to keep it around, and as a dual boot, it doesn't seem that big of an issue. Except for those 2 reasons, I really don't use it. The 2 reasons are: (i) scanning software for my scanner (no Win 10 driver); and (ii) a video editing software that I use that is not Win 10 compatible.

There are a few things I noticed when I was in XP today, but don't want to get into them right now. I know it is late for you and I'm getting ready to step away for a bit. Perhaps we can discuss them another day.
 

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Allan
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Now I understand why you want to keep XP.

I'll be around when you're ready.
 

rdkapp

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Ah well, that Recovery partition is created when you install 10 onto an empty drive, it is described well here :-
https://www.diskpart.com/windows-10/recovery-partition-after-upgrading-to-windows-10-4348.html
So, my drive wasn't empty? I'm confused. During installation and prior to the install beginning, I deleted the 3 partitions and all of its space was shown in a singular partition as "Unallocated." I did not format. From the linked article:
When installing a Windows operating system (OS) on a hard drive, and if you use Windows Setup to create new partition on an MBR disk, Windows will create a system reserved partition, and if it is a GPT disk, then Windows will create a recovery partition and an EFI system partition without drive letter. . . .

. . . Otherwise, if you install Windows on a hard drive containing multiple partitions, Windows will save the WinRE in a folder named Recovery in the root directory of your system drive (C: drive) without leaving a recovery partition.
As for the 1st paragraph above, didn't Windows Setup create a new partition on an MBR disk? Also, I'm not sure what a GPT disk is. Apparently, my newer computer has a GPT disk because it is setup as described, with a Recovery partition and an EFI System partition. Is that right? How do you know whether you have a MBR or a GPT disk?

As for the 2nd paragraph, this is apparently what happened, as I now have a Recovery folder in the root directory with no Recovery partition, but as I stated before the quote above from the article, I deleted the 3 partitions on the drive before the installation began. Is it because they were deleted within the install program and not before?
 

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It didn't create a recovery partition because you had a 2nd hard drive connected. Windows will try to put the boot up files and recovery partition onto the drive connected to the highest ranking Sata port, which must have been your XP drive, which will be an MBR type, so it couldn't do it.

The recovery partition is just another way of booting into WinRE (Windows Recovery Environment) which you can do with the install Usb instead.

To find out if a drive is MBR or GPT go to Device Manager, expand Disk Drives, right-click on the drive, click Properties > Volumes tab > Populate button and it will tell you the Partition style, MBR or GPT.

GPT is a more modern way of setting a hard drive up than MBR. GPT is used with computers that have a UEFI type Bios, MBR can still be used but it is limited to 4 Primary partitions, although you can have more by making one of the 4 an 'extended partition' with several 'logical partitions' inside it, but they can't boot windows.

For most purposes that doesn't matter much but if you can use GPT you might as well do so.

Setting up a new drive to be MBR or GPT is the very first thing you have to do to use it, you can do it in Disk Management. After that you can make partitions and format them if you want to, the whole drive can be one partition or you can make more. Each partition will be given it's own drive letter by windows but the letters can change if you boot up a different way, such as when you use the install Usb, that's why it's more precise to use drive numbers and partition numbers, they stay the same (unless you install or remove a drive).
 

rdkapp

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It didn't create a recovery partition because you had a 2nd hard drive connected. Windows will try to put the boot up files and recovery partition onto the drive connected to the highest ranking Sata port, which must have been your XP drive, which will be an MBR type, so it couldn't do it.
Ah, now I understand. Thank you for explaining and for the additional details on GPT vs. MBR. I believe my new computer has a UEFI type BIOS. It looks very updated with graphics and all; not like old BIOS setup appears. My older computer was built in 2010 and doesn't have UEFI BIOS. And yes, the XP drive is connected to the highest ranking SATA port. Is that related to hardware or software? IOW, if I switched the cables on the MB between the XP drive and the Win 10 drive, would that switch their ranking? I'm just curious.

GPT is a more modern way of setting a hard drive up than MBR. GPT is used with computers that have a UEFI type Bios, MBR can still be used but it is limited to 4 Primary partitions, although you can have more by making one of the 4 an 'extended partition' with several 'logical partitions' inside it, but they can't boot windows.

For most purposes that doesn't matter much but if you can use GPT you might as well do so.
So, other than no limitation of 4 Primary partitions with MBR and the UEFI type BIOS, are there any other benefits to GPT?

As for the XP drive, as you know, it could certainly use some cleanup and thus reduce its capacity below 95%. I'm sure there are lots of programs on there that I could uninstall and data that I could move to a universal storage drive (e.g. the NAS). There are likely programs that I would never ever use again.

One thing for sure that I noticed is that while I was booted into XP the other night, I tried to access this forum so I could reply to a post, but none of the installed browsers would work. Firefox was my default browser in XP at the time, and it wouldn't even open. Neither Chrome or IE could access this forum or even techguy.org. I don't plan on using XP very often, but when I do, there may be an occasion when I need/want to access the internet. I just need something simple, reliable, and safe (as can be). So, I could definitely uninstall Chrome, disable IE, and possibly fix Firefox, or choose one of the other browsers recommended here: https://appuals.com/the-5-best-browsers-for-windows-xp/. Also, the 1st comment to that article recommends either New Moon or Mypal over any in the list.

I also found this: http://www.xpbrowsers.com/ which was updated May 23, 2020.

Question for you: Besides Firefox, have you heard of or used any of the browsers listed in the linked articles or the comments? And if so, which would you recommend?
 

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Allan
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rdkapp

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To remove the extra Windows 10 option in the menu please install this :- https://neosmart.net/EasyBCD/
Get the free version, click on the Register button, you can leave the Email section blank if you like.
Install it and let it start, on the View tab make it's window full screen and post a screenshot please.
I'm just now getting to this. Here's the screenshot:

1590960285043.png

Another issue with regard to XP. Last night, I was cleaning up by deleting some programs in XP and ran Disk Management to see how much space I had freed up. Only the XP drive showed up with its 3 partitions (C:, D:, & E: ). Today, when I logged into XP, I ran Disk Management and did see the Win 10 drive (K: ) and the Data drive (L: ), as seen in this screenshot:

1590963735944.png

However, the Win 10 drive (K: ) is showing as blank, with no file system or files. See screenshot above and below:

1590963885226.png

Do you know the reason for this? And, is it any cause for concern with what happened before?

BTW, some positive news. I went with MyPal as a browser in XP, as it claims to support XP and is updated often and I couldn't be more pleased. It is very clean with a small footprint and there was no lag in anything I did last night. I deleted Chrome and disabled IE and I reinstalled the Firefox version recommended for XP, but it was frustrating to use with some lags, so after discovering how well MyPal worked, I made it the default browser and will keep Firefox, only if needed. MyPal also introduced me to the DuckDuckGo search engine which is a non-tracking private search engine, which I appreciate and should help with security while in XP.
 
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