Unable to boot Windows 10 after CHKDSK

managed

Allan
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I think the optical drive currently in the newer computer is an HP which was cannibalized from an older computer.

Anyway, I have to step away for awhile and I know it is getting late there. So, if you can, post with your last comments and I will follow up later tonight or tomorrow.
Ok, goodnight. I'm logging off too, back around 7pm BST.
 

rdkapp

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I guess I could try to move it to my newer computer and see if it is recognized there and move the SATA optical drive in that one to this computer and see if it will be recognized.
I may end up doing this anyway. I'll check to see which SATA optical drive is newer and check their respective burning performances and then decide. My new computer has no IDE ports, so the other optical drive must stay where it is.

I suppose it could be an intermittent cable connection.
Probably better to check the cables before doing anything else.
I will use a different cable and see if that fixes the issue. Ugh, not looking forward to digging into that machine just to swap a cable. If it turns out to be the cable, that would be weird that XP hasn't had the problem at all.

Or buy a few Usb sticks and stop using optical disks ;)
I know you were kidding, but my parents (both in their 80s) like CDs and DVDs. They wouldn't know what to do with a USB stick. :unsure:😕
 
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Macboatmaster

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Thanks, it needed a clean install of 10 in the end but it is mostly working ok now
Cheers - I forgot it needed a clean install, I somehow managed (?) to think you had managed to sort it out using TestDisk
rdkapp
Still quite impressive staying power at currently 197
 

rdkapp

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Cheers - I forgot it needed a clean install, I somehow managed (?) to think you had managed to sort it out using TestDisk
But managed managed to manage it all to work out! ;)
rdkapp
Still quite impressive staying power at currently 197
If you haven't figured it out yet, I don't give up easily. But I couldn't have done it without the help of you and Allan (managed), for which I am truly thankful.
 

rdkapp

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I have success to report on the optical drive issue. It wasn't the cable. I tried 2 different SATA cables. I even tried a different SATA port on the MB, but nothing changed.

The culprit ended up being one or multiple of the IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers. More specifically, one of the highlighted ones in the screenshot below. I know this because after deleting the top 4, it asked me to restart and without pause, I clicked "yes." It restarted and the problem persisted. I then went back and deleted all 8, this time skipping the multiple requests to restart, until the end. After restart without a disc in the drive, the drive shows up in DM, in File Explorer, in Disk Management, and when a disc is inserted, the OS sees it. Furthermore, the optical drives are now given the drive letters G: and H:, which is in order after all hard drives and what I am used to. So, the problem appears to be resolved. 🤞

1591309314929.png
 

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Allan
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That's great news, I'm really glad you *managed* to sort that out.

So, what now ?
 

rdkapp

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Not a problem but some questions (y):

While reinstalling some of my programs on the Data drive (the 1 TB mechanical), I began wondering:
1. What effect will it have on imaging the Win 10 drive if some of the programs are installed on a separate drive?
2. How will having some of the programs residing on a drive separate from the OS affect restoring the OS from the Image, in the unlikely 🤞 event that the need arises?
3. Do you recommend against installing most of my programs on the Data drive? I did this initially (years back), because my 1st SSD was only a 60 GB and it was just easier to keep it that way when I bought the bigger SSD drive. Now that I have clean installed the OS on a 250 GB SSD, and I have the input of someone more experienced and knowledgeable than I, I'm wondering what the pluses and minuses are.
4. I am considering putting the Image on a USB thumb drive rather than the Data drive. What size USB thumb drive do you think I'm gonna need?
 

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Allan
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1. You would need an Image of the Windows 10 drive and an Image of the separate drive.
2. You can restore the OS alone but you will have problems if the data on the other drive is not in sync with the apps, for example if you restore an image containing the Microsoft Office program Word made before you saved some documents from Word, then Word will not know those documents exist. That could be fixed quite easily but it could be a lot more difficult with other apps.
3. I would put everything except large data files like Videos onto the new SSD, that avoids any issues like the above.
4. Don't use a Usb thumb drive, they are not very reliable, it's much better to use the internal data drive or an external Usb drive.

If it was my setup I would use the internal data drive for any large data files like Videos and for all images.

Any data that you can't afford to lose should also be backed up elsewhere, on a CD/DVD and on a Usb thumb drive for instance, the more copies you have on different media the safer the data is.
 

rdkapp

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1. You would need an Image of the Windows 10 drive and an Image of the separate drive.
2. You can restore the OS alone but you will have problems if the data on the other drive is not in sync with the apps, for example if you restore an image containing the Microsoft Office program Word made before you saved some documents from Word, then Word will not know those documents exist. That could be fixed quite easily but it could be a lot more difficult with other apps.
3. I would put everything except large data files like Videos onto the new SSD, that avoids any issues like the above.
Combining 1, 2, & 3, I think I can say that the problems described in your answer to #2 can be resolved by just reinstalling the program and pointing it to the data. I just did that with my email client, Thunderbird. I had the program and my profile saved to the Data drive. Of course, Thunderbird (the program) would not operate correctly when I tried to open it, so I reinstalled it on to the Data drive and then pointed it to my profile and voila!, I am back in business with all my prior emails. It just needed to download the emails since the Win 10 drive became corrupted.

Despite the foregoing, I think I am going to follow your advice, but modified a bit. I am going to install programs that I use regularly (e.g. email, MS Office, web browser(s), Adobe Reader, image editor(s), etc.) on the SSD. Any other programs that I use infrequently or maybe once in a while (e.g. utilities like Recuva, EasyBCD, etc., and others that I just can't think of right now) on the Data drive. I will also continue to have all my data saved to the Data drive. I really like the fact that my data is separate from the OS and programs. I think it really saved me with the corruption of the Win 10 drive. I know that the data, wherever it may reside, needs to be backed up as well, and I like the idea of imaging the OS drive and backing up the data. If I have to reinstall a few programs that were on the Data drive, I think I could live with that.
4. Don't use a Usb thumb drive, they are not very reliable, it's much better to use the internal data drive or an external Usb drive.

Any data that you can't afford to lose should also be backed up elsewhere, on a CD/DVD and on a Usb thumb drive for instance, the more copies you have on different media the safer the data is.
And here I was, thinking you and Macboatmaster thought USB thumb drives were the be all end all ;), but I understand what you are saying. I don't know if you remember, but I mentioned earlier in the thread that I have a NAS with 4 x 4 TB drives, set up in a Raid 5, so I've got 12 TB (I think?) of storage available, as well as a few other mechanical drives around the house. So, I've got plenty of storage available. I just thought it would be convenient to have the image on a USB thumb drive that I could just plug in and restore.

Back to my question in #4. I know you probably can't give me a firm answer, because I'm sure it depends on what programs and other stuff are on the OS drive, but how much space does an Image of an OS drive take up? Is it a 1 to 1 ratio, or is there some compression involved?

Also, how often do you re-image? Do you do it every time you install a new program or do you have a schedule that you follow?
 

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Allan
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Usb sticks are fine for a lot of things, even installing Windows, but they can fail and you lose all the contents so no good for backup storage.

If the programs are small, like Recuva and EasyBCD, I would put them on the SSD, only putting a massive program or game onto the 1TB.

You can put Macrium onto a Usb stick and boot it, see under Other Tasks > Create Rescue Media, it will make the Usb for you.
In fact that's the way I do it, both to create and restore an image.

There are 3 compression settings in Macrium, I use the medium setting which is the default but you can select more or less compression than that.

I don't make images much, I would if I installed something big like Office or a large game (but I don't game).
 

rdkapp

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There are 3 compression settings in Macrium, I use the medium setting which is the default but you can select more or less compression than that.
Is Macrium Reflect the imaging software? I actually used that to back up the partitions recovered by TestDisk earlier in this thread. Are there any drawbacks to using maximum compression?
I don't make images much, I would if I installed something big like Office or a large game (but I don't game).
So, do you know what the norm is? Do others re-image as they add programs or based on a schedule?
 

managed

Allan
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Yes Macrium Reflect free. It can make Images and Clones.

You can use an Image like a backup, using the Macrium program it can be mounted as a drive with it's own drive letter then you can see it in File Explorer and it behaves just like any other drive/partition. So you can copy folders and files from it onto a 'real' drive.

I believe it takes longer to make and restore a more compressed Image file, the Cpu has to do more work which takes time. So it's a trade-off between time and image file size.
As an example to give you some idea, with the medium compression I use, a 29GB drive with 14GB of used space produced an Image file of 8.24GB, so roughly 60% of the original.

There are many different ideas on the best way to backup and/or image. You can make a 'main' image and then make 'differential' or 'incremental' images later. You have to restore the master first then either the newest differential or all the incremental images.

This sums it up well :- https://knowledgebase.macrium.com/display/KNOW/Differential+and+incremental+disk+images

Personally I just make a new main image when I've installed a new program that is large, I can't be bothered with the other types of image.

Do it in whatever way you find the best for you. You could experiment first to find out.
 

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