Unable to boot Windows 10 after CHKDSK

rdkapp

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Update:

Due to what I understand is a XCOPY limitation of being unable to transfer files that have file paths greater than 255 characters, I had to use ROBOCOPY to transfer files in a couple of sub-folders of the Windows folder. After accomplishing that, I tried to boot and found some success. Initially, it went through 2 screens with the blue Win 10 logo. One that said "Repairing your PC" and another that said "Diagnosing your PC."

Diagnosing your PC.jpg

Then, it went to the Recovery console where it gave me this screen:

Recovery.jpg

It appears that it is looking for the winload.exe file in a location that no longer exists. Remember that we renamed the dir0000.chk directory to Windows before I copied everything over. So, there is a boot file (batch?) somewhere that is referring the system to that location. If I could find that file and modify it to point to the correct location, I think I may have more, if not complete, success.

To further investigate, I pressed F9 in the above screenshot and it led to the following:

OS boot options.jpg

Remember that I only had the corrupted drive connected. The XP drive was not connected, so naturally, XP would not appear. When I chose the 1st Win 10 option, it proceeded to loop back into the BIOS. When I chose the 2nd and 3rd options, both brought me to the Windows login screen where I logged in, but the desktop never came up. The screen was black and a mouse pointer that I could move around.

I take all of the above as a positive and am now wondering if some of the recommendations earlier in this thread may take me further toward or even complete this recovery. If either managed or Macboatmaster have any ideas , I would love to hear them. Meanwhile, I will continue investigating and researching this for a complete solution.
 

rdkapp

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It appears that it is looking for the winload.exe file in a location that no longer exists. Remember that we renamed the dir0000.chk directory to Windows before I copied everything over. So, there is a boot file (batch?) somewhere that is referring the system to that location. If I could find that file and modify it to point to the correct location, I think I may have more, if not complete, success.
Perhaps it is BOOTMGR which is on the boot partition on this disk (the E: drive when attached to my working (this) computer). I wonder if the bootrec commands, or perhaps the MBR fix via the Boot Repair Disk (RUFUS) referenced earlier in the thread by Macboatmaster would do the trick? Or, maybe TestDisk, now that I've got the Windows folder in the proper place?
 

managed

Allan
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IMO you are wasting your time, even if you get into Windows there could be other problems later on with missing files etc.

By now you could have re-installed Windows and got everything how you want it several times.

If you really want to continue try putting a copy of winload.exe into the location on that screen picture, if the folders don't exist make them.
 

rdkapp

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IMO you are wasting your time, even if you get into Windows there could be other problems later on with missing files etc.

By now you could have re-installed Windows and got everything how you want it several times.
If the subject computer was my only computer, I would agree with you. However, as you know, it is not my only computer. I see this as a learning experience as well as a challenge. If I can learn something and by chance, help someone else that may run into the same problem down the road, then it is worth it to me.

This past weekend through Monday was a holiday weekend here in the U.S., and I didn't spend the entire weekend working on this corrupt drive. I spent a few hours and learned a few things along the way, and feel that I did make some progress toward my goal.

If you really want to continue try putting a copy of winload.exe into the location on that screen picture, if the folders don't exist make them.
I've tried this. Since winload.exe was already in the System32 folder, all I had to do was rename the Windows folder in found.000 to dir0000.chk, so the resulting path is found.000\dir0000.chk\System32. It booted up to the Windows login screen, but once I logged in, I only got a blank screen with a mouse pointer.

By the way, TestDisk didn't work either. There are now 7 partitions, with partitions 1, 3, 5, & 6 having damaged filesystems.

Thinking that the remaining problems are with the Boot partition (the E: drive on the working computer), I looked closer at the Boot partition and noticed a BCD.old file with a date/time around the time that the drive became corrupted. The current BCD file was dated 05/25/20, which is likely the last time I ran bootrec /rebuildbcd. I backed up the Boot partition and then renamed BCD.old to BCD. Then, I tried to boot and it ran Win10 chkdsk (this was a new occurrence) and said it was repairing the drive. I had my fingers crossed 🤞. However, just like before, it booted up to the Windows login screen and I logged in, but again, it took me to a blank screen with the mouse pointer.

Finally, I ran Macboatmaster's recommendation in Post #70 (Fix MBR Issues in Windows Using Boot Repair Disk). Although both the basic and advanced options said it fixed the MBR, booting remained the same. It boots to the Windows login screen and when I login, all I see is a blank screen and mouse pointer.

@Macboatmaster - I don't know if you wanted to see the logs posted to ubuntu.com for the above. If so, I can provide the links. Just let me know either way.

Since Win 10 is now booting to the login screen without error, and accepts my login, but then only gives me a blank screen with mouse pointer, my inexperienced guess is that the problem now lies somewhere in the GUI. In light of the above and unless Macboatmaster wants to read the logs from the Fix MBR attempts, I am ready to "change course" ;) and do a clean install of Win 10. I'll wait to hear back before I begin.
 

managed

Allan
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Yes ok, treating it as a learning experience is fair enough.

I don't know what you did but something has changed the partition table if there are 7 now.

There were 3 perfectly fine partitions in TestDisk in post #64 and they were also fine in the screenshot of Disk Management in your post #65 !

At the blank screen with mouse pointer press Ctrl+Alt+Del and if you get a Task Manager option click it and do File > Run new task, then type EXPLORER and press Enter and you might get a desktop.
 
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rdkapp

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I don't know what you did but something has changed the partition table if there are 7 now.

There were 3 perfectly fine partitions in TestDisk in post #64 and they were also fine in the screenshot of Disk Management in your post #65 !
Yes, post #64 was a screenshot right after writing the adjustments made. I believe if I re-ran TestDisk and performed a Deeper Search right after that, I think it would've shown 6 or 7 partitions. I've sort of lost faith in TestDisk as a result. The changes don't seem to stick, at least on this corrupted drive. Also, my experience tells me that TestDisk partitions don't always correspond with the partitions shown in Disk Management. If my beliefs above are wrong, then the only thing I did before the next time I ran a Deeper Search in TestDisk and found 7 partitions, was rename and copy the Windows folder from found.000/dir0000.chk to the root, using XCOPY and ROBOCOPY.
At the blank screen with mouse pointer press Ctrl+Alt+Del and if you get a Task Manager option click it and do File > Run new task, then type EXPLORER and press Enter and you might get a desktop.
I do get a Task Manager option, as I've done that every time on the blank screen, in order to shut down or restart and I've actually opened the Task Manager just to see what was running. There were apps running, including ones that run on bootup. Didn't think about running EXPLORER. If I get the desktop, where to from there?
 

managed

Allan
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TD worked perfectly before and fixed the partition table, it's main job. You had the correct 3 partitions in the end, as shown in DM.

It looks for deleted partitions so finding more after a deeper search makes sense but unless you used it's Write command again you will still have those 3 correct partitions.

The problems after that were caused by renamed folders and messed up files, TD can't possibly fix those although as you now know it can find files and let you copy them.

If you get to the Desktop let me know.
From there you should do a clean install of 10, you can't rely on what you have now even if it does seem to work, which I doubt.
 

rdkapp

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It looks for deleted partitions so finding more after a deeper search makes sense but unless you used it's Write command again you will still have those 3 correct partitions.
Okay, that makes sense. If a Deeper Search also shows deleted partitions, then that is what I'm seeing. If I remember correctly, 6 of the 7 were marked with "D." The last one was marked "*" for bootable. I was thinking that if I deleted the 1, 3, & 5 partitions, why would they continue to show up? It made me wonder why it wasn't showing the other 2 I marked with "P." I guess it may be that I just don't fully understand TestDisk, which is entirely possible and why I initially came here.

The above is for informational and learning experience only and doesn't really apply going forward. I will run EXPLORER from Task Manager and report back.
 

rdkapp

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I will run EXPLORER from Task Manager and report back.
Okay, more encouraging (I think) news. I tried to run EXPLORER from the Task Manager and I received an error message that the system couldn't find the Desktop on the D: drive. The D: drive is the drive that I setup when I originally installed Win 7 to be the storage drive for all of my data. That is where my User folder lives. For example, if I saved to the Document, Music, Pictures, or Videos folders, it automatically saved to the D: drive, as that is where those folders lived. That is why there wasn't much data on the corrupted drive. The D: drive has been disconnected for awhile.

I would've re-connected the D: drive and tried again, however, I was concerned about the drive letters. Remember that the Boot partition on the corrupt drive was assigned the drive letter C: and the Windows partition was assigned the drive letter D:. I was afraid that if I re-connected the data drive, the drive letters (the 2 D: drives) would conflict. Plus, isn't it searching for the Desktop on the very drive where it doesn't exist (i.e. the Windows partition drive - D: ), which may be the cause of the error I received in the 1st place?

Should I remove the drive letter from the Boot partition, and reassign the Windows partition with C: and then retry?
 

managed

Allan
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I asked Macboatmaster about those logs and he said he didn't need to see them.

Drive letters can change, it's best to go by the Disk numbers and partition positions in Disk Management,
for example Disk 1 Partition 2 etc they stay the same.
Incidentally Micro$oft numbers Disks starting with 0 (zero) but Partitions starting with 1 !

Any drive with an Active partition can boot, not sure what happens if 2 drives are marked Active.

I would connect that drive and see what happens, Windows should assign a new letter to it, it certainly won't get C and you can always remove it again if something odd happens.
 

rdkapp

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Drive letters can change, it's best to go by the Disk numbers and partition positions in Disk Management,
for example Disk 1 Partition 2 etc they stay the same.

I would connect that drive and see what happens, Windows should assign a new letter to it, it certainly won't get C and you can always remove it again if something odd happens.
Windows did assign it a new letter - F: and Windows kept looking for the Desktop on D:, which was the Windows partition. The Recovery partition was E:. So, I ran Disk Management from Task Manager and removed the drive letter from the Boot partition (which was C: ) and rebooted. The Windows partition then became C: and the Recovery partition became D: and the data drive became E:. I tried booting but got the same result. So, I then ran Disk Management from Task Manager and removed the drive letter from the Recovery partition and changed the drive letter of the data drive to D: and rebooted. Sadly, it did not boot to the Desktop. I ran Task Manager and tried to run Explorer and nothing happened. I even browsed to Explorer in the Windows/SysWOW64 folder (it wasn't in the Windows folder) and selected and tried to run it but nothing happened.

So, I'm ready to change course and clean install Win 10. I just have 2 questions before I begin, and I believe you have already answered the 1st one earlier in this thread:
  1. How do I ensure the dual boot environment with Win 10 and XP?
  2. Will the Win 10 OS install recognize and properly set up references to the data drive that already exists and holds all my Documents, Music, Pictures, and Videos, as well as other data?
Any information on the 2nd question will be greatly appreciated.
 
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managed

Allan
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Do you already have a Windows 10 install USB or DVD ?

If not go here and get the Media Creation Tool and make one :- https://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/sof...s10?d2784474-fdb0-4e9d-9e47-5e88c0e053ec=True

With Both drives connected install 10 by booting to that USB or DVD, choose the Custom Option, delete all the partitions on the drive until it is all shown as unallocated space, then continue the install, 10 will make the partitions it needs automatically.

You will have to set up the locations of your files after the install.
 

rdkapp

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Do you already have a Windows 10 install USB or DVD ?
Yes, I already have Win 10 install media.
With Both drives connected install 10 by booting to that USB or DVD, choose the Custom Option, delete all the partitions on the drive until it is all shown as unallocated space, then continue the install, 10 will make the partitions it needs automatically.

You will have to set up the locations of your files after the install.
For purposes of clarity and understanding, I will use the following drive descriptions:

a. Corrupted Drive - the Win 10 drive that we have been working on in this thread.​
b. XP Drive - the drive that contains the XP OS that dual booted with the Win 10 drive before corruption.​
c. Data Drive - the drive that contains most of the data and some programs used with Win 10 (not XP).​

So, if I understand correctly:
  1. With (i) the Corrupted Drive, (ii) the XP Drive, and (iii) the Data Drive (D: ) all connected, I should boot the computer with the Win 10 install disc, and choose the Custom Option.
  2. I should delete all partitions on the Corrupted Drive until it is all shown as unallocated space and then continue the install on the Corrupted Drive.
  3. The location of the data and programs on the Data Drive will be set up after install.
I want to focus on #3, because I want to make sure this is correct, as I don't want to fill up my boot drive with data and I know what it took to modify this after the fact in XP. I had an XP machine that ran out of space on its boot drive and I wanted to move the data to a storage drive. I had to modify the Registry and it was a long process that I'm not sure was ever 100% successful. I initially set up the Data Drive when I installed Win 7 on this machine and I have a vague recollection of doing it during installation. Has this changed in Win 10? If I wanted to do it on this computer (working Win 10), how would I do it?
 

Macboatmaster

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rdkapp
On the black screen after signing in, if you press the Win key + R - does a run window open please and if it does, if you then type cmd, and click OK
does the cmd window open please

This is only of relevance if you have not started the clean install
 

rdkapp

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3. The location of the data and programs on the Data Drive will be set up after install.
I want to focus on #3, because I want to make sure this is correct, as I don't want to fill up my boot drive with data and I know what it took to modify this after the fact in XP. I had an XP machine that ran out of space on its boot drive and I wanted to move the data to a storage drive. I had to modify the Registry and it was a long process that I'm not sure was ever 100% successful. I initially set up the Data Drive when I installed Win 7 on this machine and I have a vague recollection of doing it during installation. Has this changed in Win 10? If I wanted to do it on this computer (working Win 10), how would I do it?
OK, nevermind. I found this: https://www.dummies.com/computers/o...e-the-location-of-user-folders-in-windows-10/ and a bunch of other how-to sources.

It's nice when Microsoft finally makes changes to the OS with the user in mind. I will proceed with the install and if I do not come across anything that will allow me to link up the Data Drive as the place to save Documents, Music, Pictures, Videos, etc., I will do it after install.
 
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