Unable to boot Windows 10 after CHKDSK

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rdkapp

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I don't see setup.exe in the directory of the USB drive. I also looked inside all of the sub-directories. Here's a screenshot:

1590711362158.png

I thought you were referring to the Boot Repair USB that I made from Post #70. I do have Win 10 install media on a DVD which I know I can access in Command Prompt.
 

Macboatmaster

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Sorry I have to go
I asked
Do you have the installation media made on the usb drive
and you replied Yes

I apologise if there was confusion, but you cannot of course repair windows 10 as on the link I sent from a Linux boot repair disc.

IT WILL NOT WORK from a DVD
I suggest you remake it on a USB

The details in the link to the repair install show a mounted ISO but that is on a virtual CD drive
NOT the installation media as you need to make on a usb drive

From cmd prompt it is possible to mount an ISO, but with your situation it is unlikely to MOUNT, so you need the full install files on the USB
It will look like this Untitled3.png
 
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rdkapp

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Sorry I misunderstood. That Linux Boot Repair USB is the only media I've created in relation to this thread. So, I was focusing on the word "made." I apologize.
 

rdkapp

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Can I just copy from the DVD to a USB drive, or do I have to download the ISO again?
 

Macboatmaster

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I have attached a screenshot to my previous post of the USB
NO you cannot copy from the DVD
I am not quite sure you have this right
You do not download the ISO as such
You select to make a USB installation media
From the Microsoft link

Select which media you want to use:
  • USB flash drive. Attach a blank USB flash drive with at least 8GB of space. Any content on the flash drive will be deleted.
  • ISO file. Save an ISO file to your PC, which you can use to create a DVD. After the file is downloaded, you can go to location where the file is saved, or select Open DVD burner, and follow the instructions to burn the file to a DVD. For more info about using an ISO file, see Additional methods for using the ISO file to install Windows 10 section below.
Cheers
Goodnight
 

Macboatmaster

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AND you are far better installing even on a clean install from a USB flash pen than you are from a DVD
 

rdkapp

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I accessed the DVD and found and ran setup.exe. It is loading as I type.

You are correct, I probably do not have the terminology exactly right. I haven't done it very often. I just know that there is an ISO involved.
 

rdkapp

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Here's where it's at:

1590712752606.png

I have to step away for a bit and I know it's late. I will look closer at the article and try to follow along as far as I can and will post back when finished with the results. I appreciate your help and the fact that you hung around so late.

BTW, my confusion is clear from Post #115. Sorry again.
 

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Allan
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I think he has logged off for the night.

Just click on Next at that screenshot.

I'm logging off myself now, when the PC reboots don't 'press any key to boot from DVD'.
 
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rdkapp

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It can't go further than the next screen as it's in Safe Mode. I didn't know it was in Safe Mode, but the images on the display are larger like they are in Safe Mode. I just thought the GUI was having issues.

1590723759568.png

I'll be doing a clean install and will post an update when I'm finished, or if I run into any snags.

As always, I appreciate all the help.
 

Macboatmaster

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Indeed, as on the tutorial
You will only be able to do a repair install of Windows 10 from within Windows 10. You will not be able to do a repair install at boot or in safe mode
I cannot remember now, having only come in on he topic, on occasions, if the SAFE boot was set at some stage, or if it has booted safe mode, not being able to boot normal mode
 

Macboatmaster

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Why, because it's faster?
Partially, yes, even the slowest usb drive is usually considerably faster for read, than the fastest dvd drive
Additionally, people have encountered problems using a DVD, especially from the aspect of
a blank DVD (and DVD burner)
as shown on the Microsoft download media creation site.

If it is burnt too fast, it may appear to work at the start, but often fails halfway through the install.
There are other reasons, that it fails, but the answer is IMHO - use a flash drive.
If you want to try it with DVD and it works that is great
The fact it works for you, does NOT eliminate the inherent risk in using a DVD as afainst a flash pen.
 

rdkapp

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Indeed, as on the tutorial
You will only be able to do a repair install of Windows 10 from within Windows 10. You will not be able to do a repair install at boot or in safe mode
I cannot remember now, having only come in on he topic, on occasions, if the SAFE boot was set at some stage, or if it has booted safe mode, not being able to boot normal mode
Yes, I read the tutorial and knew it wouldn't work in safe mode. I just didn't know the computer was in safe mode. Other than the lower resolution of the display which I attributed to problems with the GUI, nothing told me it was in safe mode. SAFE boot wasn't set. It was booting into safe mode on its own as I never did anything to cause it to boot into safe mode.

After the clean install, we were initially back in business; however, after I dual booted into XP, it is now having problems, described below:

1. The install went smoothly. After the install, it booted up and I logged in. I shut down or restarted a few times and everything appeared to be working well.

2. During the install, I was never presented with any screen recognizing the XP OS sitting on the other drive. So, I wanted to see if dual boot was still available. The MB splash screen that comes up when I power on has a menu, which includes F12 for Boot Menu. That takes me to a screen that looks like it's in BIOS Setup to "Select a Boot First Device." From there, I select "+ Hard Disk" which takes me to a screen where all the connected drives show up, including the Win 10 (formerly corrupted) drive, the XP drive, and the Data drive. The foregoing is all the same as it was before the Win10 drive became corrupted. From this point forward, everything is different than before the Win10 drive became corrupted. I selected the XP drive and it took me to the following screen:

1590735067937.png
So, although this was different than before, I thought it looked normal, except the fact that there are 2 listings for Windows 10. Do either of you know why? Is that normal? I selected "Earlier Version of Windows" and it rebooted back to the MB splash screen and then the XP splash screen and it booted into XP and everything appeared to be there and it looked normal. So, I decided to make the registry change suggested by Macboatmaster, to stop XP from deleting the Win 10 RPs when I dual boot to XP. I followed the tutorial exactly and I thought everything went well . . . so I thought . . .

3. When I logged off XP and restarted the computer, and after the MB splash screen, I received this screen:

1590786502652.png
This has happened several times, but not every time I reboot. Most of the time it happens, it is after dual booting into XP, but sometimes it has happened just after being in Win 10. For example, last night I was working in Win 10 and I shut down. Today, when I booted up, I got the "DISK BOOT FAILURE" screen. I've been able to get past it sometimes with CTRL-ALT-DEL, sometimes with a Hard Reboot, and sometimes by just sticking the Win 10 install disk in the DVD drive (but it doesn't boot from it). It's rather strange.

4. I also found this strange. I am currently in Win 10 on the subject computer and pulled up Disk Management. It takes longer than usual for the disks to show up, but here's the screen shot:

1590787195788.png
C: is the newly clean installed Win 10 drive. Where are the other partitions? Could XP have deleted them when I first dual booted into it? Isn't that strange?

I would love your feedback on the above. Awaiting your replies, but I'm thinking a new clean install is in order and possibly a deeper look into the dual boot situation.
 
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