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Unable to contact your DHCP server

Discussion in 'Networking' started by surffishermanca, Jan 31, 2007.

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  1. surffishermanca

    surffishermanca Thread Starter

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    I just acquired two Gateway e6000 Pentium 4 2.4 Ghz XP PRO machines from work,(put out to pasture). They were setup to login to our domain at work and then after authentication you could access the internet. They were setup to receive an IP address from our domain controller and DNS was controlled by a local server. After bringing them home, I removed them from the domain and created a workgroup. I also set all TCP/IP properties to authenticate automatically and removed all instances for DNS. My current internet connection at home is a Westell Ethernet ADSL Modem C90-36R516 with a Cat5 cable going directly to the NIC. My existing home computer powers up and receives an IP address from the Westell without a problem but when I try attaching either of the Gateways, I get the error listed above. I have spent many hours troubleshooting this problem. I have tried the release/renew command, clearing the IP stack with netsh, checking security policy, clearing IP filtering, plus many, many other things. I was able to establish a connection and get on the internet with a Gateway but only after I gave the new Gateway a fixed IP address, default gateway and DNS entries that matched the current settings of my home computer. Correct me if I am wrong but I think I am issued a different IP by my Westell modem/router every time I boot up my computer. Or does this IP come from my ISP? And if the IP changes with every login, the Gateways will then not be able to login after a shutdown. Any ideas on how to get these two machines to login and receive an IP automatically like my existing home computer? Am I asking the right questions? Did I provide enough information? Thanks in advance for any help.
     
  2. cwwozniak

    cwwozniak Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    Chuck
    Hi surffishermanca, and welcome to TSG.

    Some ISPs (like SBC/ATT) configure the DHCP server on the modem to only give out a limit of one IP address, unless you sign up for some type of home networking plan. Try power cycling the modem when you switch computers.

    EDIT: Thank you very much for all the details. Most people here would rather sift through bits of extra data than not having enough. (y)
     
  3. surffishermanca

    surffishermanca Thread Starter

    Joined:
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    Chuck,
    Thanks for the input. That makes sense but shouldn't the modem then issue this same or different single IP to the Gateway when it is attached? I have tried power cycling the modem and Gateways without success. I just failed to mention it on my first post.
     
  4. cwwozniak

    cwwozniak Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    First Name:
    Chuck
    surffishermanca,

    Just to warn ya, I am not intimately familiar with the finer points of DHCP servers. I suspect that the DHCP server "leases" a given IP address to a given machine for a certain amount of time (hours to days). That address may still stayed assigned to a given machine even if you unplug it and plug in a another one that asks for an IP address.

    Powering the down the modem for a minute or so and then turning it back on should reset the DHCP server ready for any computer to connect, request and get an IP address. If the newer computer still can not get an IP address, you might want to get into its DOS/CMD screen and type in ipconfig /all and then copy and paste the results into a new post here. Somebody here may be able to find the problem in the results.

    Were you planning on having multiple computers connected at the same time? If so, you just may want to get a broadband router. It would take care of any DHCP limits in the modem.
     
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