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Uninstalling Xbox from Windows 10

Discussion in 'Windows 10' started by Punctual, Sep 7, 2019.

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  1. Punctual

    Punctual Thread Starter

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    I have just bought a Surface Pro6 with Windows 10 operating system. I don't have any need for it so would like to uninstall it. Please can you tell me how to do it?

    Thanks

    Punctual
     
  2. bassfisher6522

    bassfisher6522

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    You should be able to just right click the app and select uninstall. Or use Revo Uninstaller, which I personally use. In Revo Uninstaller, select windows app, let it populate and then select what app you want to uninstall.
     
  3. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    Ccleaner will also do the job for you AND in addition, you can clean all types of junk files, etc from your system.
     
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  4. lunarlander

    lunarlander

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    Just tried Revo Free. It only removes the Win App from the admin account. And in the admin account, the app is gone. But in other accounts, the app is still there. It can be run. ( I did the scan after initial removal and removed the registry keys and also the WinApps program folder ) I tried it with the Xbox app.

    CCleaner does the same thing. I tried it previously. It only removes it from the current account.

    Incidentally, you can use Settings > Apps and click on an app there and choose Uninstall. This will remove the app from the current user. But the app is stored else where.

    I guess since XBox is a cash cow, MS really don't want people to be able to uninstall it.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2019
  5. Punctual

    Punctual Thread Starter

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    Thanks for your replies. I have installed it by using Revo.
     
  6. bassfisher6522

    bassfisher6522

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    This is the inherent problem with multiple accounts on a PC as each account has to be gone into.
     
  7. bassfisher6522

    bassfisher6522

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    The only down side to removing this is; when MS updates us with a new build version....it will be reinstalled.
     
  8. lunarlander

    lunarlander

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    The problem does not lie in using multiple accounts. Revo starts by using the MS provided powershell command to remove a Win App. And that method is designed to remove it only from the current account. If you create a new account, Windows finds the software from it's internal store somewhere and installs it again. So it is designed to work that way - to make a Win App always available to the next user (newly created or existing). I am guessing that the actual storage lies somewhere in \Windows\WinSxS, but I have not yet delved into it further. For example, sfc /scannow can retrieve a good copy of Windows components when they are corrupted. So it must be store separately somewhere.

    Separate Windows accounts for each user is the way Windows is designed to be used. You can have your own email servers, your own bookmarks etc etc. And also, in a limited way, it stops attacks if you use a standard account for day to day use. It's the 'least privilege' principle in IT security - only provide the required privilege for a user to execute her tasks; nothing more. That way, a malware should not be able to do system wide damage as when you are using an admin account, daily. There are ways that malware can get around this, but it is the least we can do. Small things go a long way.

    Anyways, the only reason I'm looking at this is for removing attack surface. The more programs you have accessible to the user, the more attack surface you present to an attacker. Eg, if you have MS Office Excel, it has macro capability. And with a careless opening of an email attachment, you can get infected. So if you don't need a program, it is better to remove it. It does make for more work for a system's administrator when provisioning new accounts, but that's what they are paid to do.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2019
  9. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    If you have pro or enterprise, you can also use group policy to hide all Microsoft Consumer Experiences ie candy crush, xbox, etc.
    Hide Applications by Group Policy Settings
    1. Open/Create a new group policy object in the “Group Policy Management Editor”
    2. Navigate to Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Cloud Content
    3. Click on “Turn off Microsoft consumer experience
    4. Switch the status of the policy to enabled.
     
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  10. lunarlander

    lunarlander

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    Thanks crjdriver, did not notice that policy setting before.
     
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