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Unpowered SSD can begin lose data after only one week.

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Alex Ethridge, May 10, 2015.

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  1. Alex Ethridge

    Alex Ethridge Thread Starter

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    Found this on SlashDot this morning. Had I known this before installing my first ever SSD this week, I would not have done it. I back up user data daily and image the disk weekly and save the most recent seven images, leave my computer on 24/7; but, I don't like the idea of this:

    The standards body for the microelectronics industry has found that Solid State Drives (SSD) can start to lose their data and become corrupted if they are left without power for as little as a week. ... According to a recent presentation (PDF) by Seagate's Alvin Cox, who is also chairman of the Joint Electron Device Engineering Council (JEDEC), the period of time that data will be retained on an SSD is halved for every 5 degrees Celsius (9 degrees Fahrenheit) rise in temperature in the area where the SSD is stored.


    Until now, I thought SSD was kinda like flash; but, it seems now not even near so.
     
  2. Macboatmaster

    Macboatmaster Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    It has for years been known that memory chips can suffer data loss
    That is why flash pen drives are not recommended for long term storage
    However with the vast improvement of chips used on current SSD drives and indeed all except the perhaps the very first models to hit the market, there is no real fear in any normal operating system environment

    [​IMG]




    it would more or less need to be stored in very unusual conditions, not where one would normally leave a computer or indeed store a hard drive


    Intel publish 3 months at 40C in POS


    However I do of course agree that if the user is not aware of the risk, it will come as a shock
     
  3. Alex Ethridge

    Alex Ethridge Thread Starter

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    Thanks for the input. I wish I had known about this before I bought this SSD. I would have stuck with mechanical. It has been established that magnetic is still king for long-term backup and SSD isn't in any danger of dethroning it and reliability, to me, is still my most important "feature" to look for in any device.

    There just can't be enough difference between the speed of SSD and mechanical to attract me away from that. I have a computer in my shop right now that has been off for almost a month. I certainly won't be getting any more SSDs.
     
  4. eric55

    eric55

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    I switched to ssd because the speed you get is mind blowing like night and day, ssd data loss isnt a concern as im constantly backed up with carbonite
     
  5. Macboatmaster

    Macboatmaster Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    With respect, it should be a concern, if your only backup is carbonite
    Unlikely as it seems, no one can ever guarantee that cloud backup is always going to be there. Disaster can always occur


    Unlike a conventional hard drive, data on an SSD cannot be written to any given cell until it is empty - more or les exactly the same as with ram, albeit the in depth technology is different


    Unlike HDD blocks, SSD cells can’t be over written, they must be empty before they can store data. So SSDs use a system to manage empty cells, and erase cells that are available to record data. If they didn’t use that system, they would quickly become very slow


    Therefore recovery of data from an SSD is in the circumstances of loss - more or less impossible, whereas with the conventional hard drive even free recovery software will sometimes find the important data


    For any data of value either in financial terms or personal value terms, two backups are vital and IMHO even more so if one source is beyond your personal control
     
  6. eric55

    eric55

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    Thanks for that info ill definitely give my backup plan another look but theres no way i can go back to a regular HDD after the SSD experience
     
  7. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    Alex stop worrying. I have had a number of ssd drives and the only ones that gave me problems were 1st gen ocz drives. Those were pretty bad [ocz did replace both drives] One of the replacement drives is still running in my wife's desktop.

    I just pulled a ssd out of the parts closet that had win7 installed. Drive was sitting for at least 6 months [most likely longer] and it booted right up.

    I agree with macbootmaster; the only backup I trust is one I hold. In addition, NO backup is worth anything until you validate your ability to restore the backup. I see many threads where someone made an image with macrium, acronis, or whatever; when they try and restore the image, then they have problems.
     
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