1. Computer problem? Tech Support Guy is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations. Click here to join today! If you're new to Tech Support Guy, we highly recommend that you visit our Guide for New Members.

USB memory sticks: for booting, which?

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by zapp22, Jul 2, 2010.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Advertisement
  1. zapp22

    zapp22 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2004
    Messages:
    520
    someone lemme know what memory stick to buy for purposes of booting up live stick ??
     
  2. GreyGuy

    GreyGuy

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2006
    Messages:
    79
    I think just about any stick will do so long as it holds your image. The sticking point I found was making sure you properly format it. I found HP USB Disk Storage Format Tool. Pretty easy stuff.
     
  3. zapp22

    zapp22 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2004
    Messages:
    520
    i'll try that. i was looking at their usb flash util yesterday.

    i have in the collection a geeksquad stick that shows up as a scsi drive, with an os-let.. and I cannot find a way to format it so as to make the whole thing usable. if you know a way, pls pass it on.
     
  4. saikee

    saikee

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2004
    Messages:
    3,887
    MS Windows resticts the use of a USB flash drive and treats it as a super floppy that can have only one partition. Therefore it is hard to do partitioning with it.

    Use a Linux and you can have any filing system and any number of partitions but remember Windows only mount the first one it recognises and ignore the rest.

    MS Windows cannot boot from a USB unless it has been hacked but standard Vista and Win7 installers, copied from an instllation DVD, can be booted from a USB flash drive.

    Many Linux boot perfectly from a USB device.
     
  5. zapp22

    zapp22 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2004
    Messages:
    520
    hi saikee!
    i was about to post over in the linux camp: gave netbook remix 10.4 a whiirl, which prompted the question - i was not too sure that the install would go ok from the stick. but it did. on a Samsung nc10 it worked right out of the box and impressively identified all the hardware resources and registered them correctly.

    question: the toshiba satellite I have been wrestling has no boot option for usb. can you tell me exactly how to code something on a cd, as small as possible, that would just let me kickstart that process from the stick? is it the same as what we talked about earlier? invoking grub2 from a command?
     
  6. zapp22

    zapp22 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2004
    Messages:
    520
    let me put it more succinctly: what's the fastest way for me to get up and coherent, access that memory stick, and fire up netbook-remix?? it works! couldn't believe it but it got the networking right on the first pass. problem solved. now buying a big honkin' usb stick so i have some playspace
     
  7. zapp22

    zapp22 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2004
    Messages:
    520
    aarrr. one more question. I cobbled up two sticks, one with 1gb, the other 2gb, installed in two usb ports. how do I tell ubuntu install to use both together as an installable block? i'm trying, but it not seeing the whole 3gb
     
  8. saikee

    saikee

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2004
    Messages:
    3,887
    zapp22,

    You can build a Grub1 CD according the instruction given in Grub manual from GNU/Grub.

    For Grub2 CD refers to Task K2 of Just booting tips in my signature.

    If you want one ready made check out those Live CD packaged it as the boot loader in Task J4 of Just booting tips. A Linux Live CD/DVD is normally booted by isolinux but some use Grub. You get hold of such a CD, press "esc" for a text mode then press the "c" key and get a Grub prompt.

    In a Grub prompt you can ask Grub to boot from any block device of internal hard disk, external hard disk or USB flash drive. The most versatile is to create one with Grub2 (Task j4)

    You can put two flash drive to work as one. A flash drive is just a hard disk for you to create partitions and format them in the filing systems of your choice. In Linux you can mount different partition for different directories.

    There two main installations in a flash drive. One is to use it as a Live CD. This mean you copy the entire iso into the flash drive and configure a boot loader to boot it. The foot print is same size as the Live CD or < 700Mb. This is called Frugal install in Puppy.

    The other is to install the Linux into a flash drive normally. The files are decompressed and all settings are saved automatically but you end up with a foot print 4 to 5 times the CD. This installation is not recommended because flash drive is very slow for continuous read/write.
     
  9. zapp22

    zapp22 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2004
    Messages:
    520
    then i need to copy the iso to the pendrive, and config a loader, which would be task j4.

    you write some interesting articles.
     
  10. zapp22

    zapp22 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2004
    Messages:
    520
    i'm probably not reading correctly, but in reading your site, it would seem K3 is more what I'm after - a fast handoff over to the usb block that has the boot bin on it.

    except I need to mount the device drivers for the usb stack, right?
    "mkdir /mnt/sda9
    mount /dev/sda9 /mnt/sda9
    chroot /mnt/sda9
    grub-install --force /dev/sda9
    exit"

    also, how to get a "root prompt" to paste those commands to?
    is it ok to simply invoke "cmd" or "term" as the first command?
     
  11. saikee

    saikee

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2004
    Messages:
    3,887
    Task K3 of Just booting tips is for the case when you have already had a Linux in the partition dev/sda9 booted by Grub2 in the MBR. If you wish the Linux in sda9 "chainloadable" by another boot loader then follow Task K3.

    When one boot loader boot another boot loader it boot each other like a chain. After Task K3 the Linux inside sda9 can be booted by Grub1, Lilo or any boot loader from Xp, Vista or Win7.

    The commands can be issued in any root terminal from a Linux with Grub2. This is any terminal or konsole after you have invoked the root privilege. The root privilege is given if you type "su" and supply the root password. For Ubuntu family distro you type "sudo su" and supply the user password as these distros do not provide a root user account in a normal installation. Some distros like Puppy, Slax, Slackware etc give you a root terminal without having to ask for it.

    If you intend to play around booting one or several distros in a USB flash drive this thread may be for you as it has steps for converting syslinux into Grub. The read was written initially for putting several distros in one DVD and then transferring the contents to a flash drive.

    Many Internet sites give details of how to put their distro into a flash drive. Mine is a general method with a bit of explanations.
     
  12. Sponsor

As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 733,556 other people just like you!

Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Short URL to this thread: https://techguy.org/932910

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice