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USB speeds and PCMCIA cards.

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Rivera42, Apr 14, 2008.

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  1. Rivera42

    Rivera42 Thread Starter

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    My thinkpad 600x, xp pro sp2, has one usb 1.0 port, to which I've connected several USB 2.0 peripherals, printer, bluetooth adapter, and whatnot. I've had this setup in place for several months with no discernible problems, or any lag in the BT mouse or keyboard. I assume these devices are all running at 1.0 speeds. What I want to know is whether id be better off buying a USB 2.0 pcmcia card and running my devices off of that? Am I risking an overload of some sort, having these devices all piggybacked on a single 1.0 port?

    The problem with getting a 2.0 card is that I use a wireless network adapter card in my other card slot, meaning i'd have to buy a USB network adapter to replace the card I use now. This is because my two card slots are stacked one above t'other.

    If this had come up months ago I probly would have just gone ahead and done this, but I hesitate now because I prefer to think it's time to buy a new computer soon and as such I wish not to spend any more on the faithful workhorse I have now than absolutely necessary.
     
  2. Rivera42

    Rivera42 Thread Starter

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  3. jackdw

    jackdw

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    Only advantage of USB2 vs USB1/1.1 is for memory sticks. USB2 is very noticeably faster.

    As for the overloading issue, depends what "and whatnot" is exactly.
     
  4. Rivera42

    Rivera42 Thread Starter

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    Connected to my laptop's sole USB 1.0 port is a 7-port AC-powered Belkin hub, which has a non-powered 4-port Targus hub plugged into one of the 3 lower ports. The 4-port hub is placed near the computer in order to operate the Logitech webcam and Dynex (Best Buy inhouse brand) external 3.5" floppy disk drive, both of which have very short cords. These items are usually only plugged in when necessary.
    Directly plugged into the other 2 lower ports on the Belkin are an AC-powered 500GB Western Digital hard drive, and a Kensington Bluetooth dongle.
    Connected to the ports in the upper section is an AC-powered Epson Stylus printer/scanner which is sometimes also used as a memory card reader, in place of the separate SanDisk MobileMate SD+ which I sometimes use, though which of the many USB ports I stick it in changes from session to session.
    Frequently I will have one or more SanDisk 2GB flash drives plugged in as well, and occasionally I use the USB port to charge a Motorola Q700 (T-Mobile Sidekick Slide) and/or exchange music and picture files between the laptop and the smartphone.
    Paired with the computer's Bluetooth system are a Rocketfish (another Best Buy store brand) mouse and keyboard, a Motorola H500 headset, and the Q700.

    All devices listed are USB 2.0 as indicated by product labeling and package information.

    I hope this information is specific enough to aid in your replies; for system information please check my TSG user profile.
     
  5. Rivera42

    Rivera42 Thread Starter

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    The state of things is such that I did go ahead and buy a new computer after all, but I continue to use the old laptop as well. I have been looking for a USB 2.0 PCI card so that I can plug my Bluetooth wireless adapter into one port and my USB wifi adapter (yep, I went ahead and got one of those too, and AFAICT it seems to have been the right move) into the other port. Thing is, I haven't had any luck finding such a card without an external power port - and I must stress these cards don't necessarily include an AC adapter, merely the jack for one and the oft-repeated suggestion to track one down. If this PCI card is for a notebook (and it is) then why do I keep hearing that I must use an AC adapter? It's supposed to be used with a portable computer, so I would expect a portable design. In particular I'm thinking of the one they sell at Best Buy, since it seems to be the only one physically available in my town. If I'm only using the card to run the two wireless radios I have mentioned, do I really need an AC power plug?
     
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