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Use D-Link G624T with modem.

Discussion in 'Networking' started by macaia, Oct 28, 2007.

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  1. macaia

    macaia Thread Starter

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    Hello,

    My Internet link at home is provided by a TV-cable player. They provided me with a cable modem, model Scientific Atlanta DPX 2203. Unfortunately the cable modem has not wi-fi features.

    To set-up a wi-fi network, I would like to use a DSL router I bought one year ago while leaving in Spain, model D-Link G624T.

    The main issue is that the D-link WAN port is not suited to an Ethernet cable but just to a DSL entry.

    I understand that the solution is to explain to the modem that 1 of the 4 LAN entries should act as a wan port. Could someone help me out on this? Is this problem a very difficult one to overcome or relatively simple?

    Thanks a lot
     
  2. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    The D-Link G624T is a modem/router, so you can't use connect it to a cable modem. Also, since your cable account most likely only gives you a single IP address, even the alternate connection for the router to create a wireless switch won't help.

    You need a new router with an Ethernet WAN connection.
     
  3. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    John may have posted too hastily. The modem is a VOIP modem, so maybe it is also a router. The user manual talks a lot about connecting multiple ethernet devices or ethernet and USB at the same time but doesn't explicitly say whether it has NAT and Dhcp server. Show the following and we should be able to tell.

    Start, Run, CMD, OK to open a command prompt:

    Type the following command:

    IPCONFIG /ALL

    Right click in the command window and choose Select All, then hit Enter.
    Paste the results in a message here.

    If necessary use a text file and removable media to copy the results to a computer with internet access.
     
  4. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    Sorry Terry, John did not post too hastily.

    The DSL-G624T supports the latest ADSL2/ADSL2+ standards, providing speeds of up to 24Mbps downstream and 1Mbps upstream (ADSL2+), or 12Mbps downstream and 1Mbps upstream (ADSL2). This router auto-senses the connection type and auto-negotiates the best modulation scheme, using the G.hs (handshake) protocol.

    Built-in ADSL/ADSL2/ADSL2+ modem (Annex A)
     
  5. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    I was unclear (maybe I posted too hastily!); I was talking about the Scientific Atlanta DPX 2203.
     
  6. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    OK Terry, but the problem is that he wanted to connect the WAN port of his router to the modem. :) There is no NAT layer in this modem, or at least this User Manual doesn't mention anything about it. That being the case, I figured he probably really needs the routing function of the wireless router.
     
  7. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    Isn't it true that VoIP modems often have a NAT layer? I also mentioned that I can't find anything in the manual about NAT (or Dhcp server).

    I just wanna see an ipconfig so we can stop quibbling about no real difference. :)

    If my use of "too hastily" hurt you I am sorry. My thinking is that even if there is only a 1% chance that modem is a modem/router combo it is worth seeing an ipconfig before a new wireless router is purchased.
     
  8. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    No problem, I was not damaged by the phrase. :D

    The fact they don't mention anything about DHCP, NAT, port forwarding, etc., leads me to believe that it's a straight modem. I've run across this before with VoIP modems, and I'm not entirely sure how they separate the IP addresses without a NAT layer. Perhaps the VoIP has another public IP address? I think that's how Comcast's VoIP works.
     
  9. macaia

    macaia Thread Starter

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    John, Terry,

    Thank you very much for your help. I´m at work now, I will post my ipconfig /all when at home, this night.

    Just to give you some context, my situation is shared by more than 1 million Net Globo users here in Brazil (mostly in Sao Paulo and in the South East states of Brazil). Net is not providing a wireless cable modem nor a multi-LAN ports cable modem, so completely restricting the shared usage of the Internet connection.

    I have a 8 mega Internet connection, a pretty decent and expensive one, and used to DSL services offered by European providers, so I´m quite shocked to be restricted like I am now.

    It´s not fully clear to me why they are doing this , but I understand they have commercial reasons, like selling multi-access services or something like that. Useless to say that I hate them right now.

    Thanks a lot again,
    Francesco
     
  10. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    The wireless broadband router should solve that issue, however the one you have doesn't have an Ethernet WAN port, so you'll need a compatible model.
     
  11. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    Whatever modem or modem/router your ISP supplies is surely built into the price of the service. For example, my cable internet provider supplies just a simple cable modem; when I started the service 5 years ago I questioned them and found that the cheap and used looking thing was costing me $5/month. I returned it after buying my own for about $90. So if my modem completely breaks today my cost was $1.50/month for better equipment.

    Bottom line--you're probably better off financially and technically buying your own router.
     
  12. macaia

    macaia Thread Starter

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    Terry,

    I´m a little confused now. Are you suggesting me to give back the Scientific Atlanta DPX 2203 cable modem and buy a new device that puts together the multi-lan port and the wireless features I´m missing now? If so, which one?

    Thank you very much,
    Francesco
     
  13. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    No, sorry. I shouldn't be posting to this thread--I keep confusing everybody! :(

    I'm suggesting that you are better off with the status quo (their modem, your soon-to-be new router) than if they supplied a modem/router.

    You could check with them and see how much, if anything, your bill would be less if you did not use their modem. Some ISPs will supply a different modem or modem/router if you ask, so you might ask them about that also.

    If you bought your own you'd need to consider whether you want a separate modem and router or a combination unit, and whether you use and need the VoIP.
     
  14. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    Since this is a VoIP modem, I would suggest keeping it. I'd buy the broadband router, which I think is what Terry is suggesting. :)
     
  15. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    Finally! Somebody understands my rambling. :) At least a little bit of it.
     
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