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Want to drive backup for Raid 5

Discussion in 'Business Applications' started by djangojazz, May 8, 2007.

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  1. djangojazz

    djangojazz Thread Starter

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    Raid 5 has 3 drives working but only one is actually needed for a backup, correct? I was thinking of getting a backup system going for my server, Windows Small Business Server 2003(basically Win Server Enterprise 2003), and looked up Ghost on Norton's site. My company used an older version of Ghost when we had a 2000 server environment and it worked great but I don't know what version it was but I do know that we did not have raid at all on that server.

    Now I am new to the whole idea of backing up a server and implementing the system myself but at this point I would like to. The current server is decently fast for a small business and has a dual core HT Pentium chip with 4 gigs RAM but I am ignorant on the FSB and Ram brand and I want to say the FSB is in the 533 to 650 meg range but not in the current 800 and 1066 ranges. It has a front drive loading bay for the harddrives to be hooked up to a tray bay, pop it in and go. Currently the system has a RAID 5 card with 3 active in that config and one hot ready if one of the others fails.

    Regardless it is fast enough for our company but I want to back it up with the least time possible to get the info back up. We do not currently have a backup server so the data being on a harddrive that is readily accessible would be great to use on a PC to make as a temporary server would be ideal. If that sounds scary tell me what you would do, it is basically one server 2003 being a file server, DNS and network server, stores Sharepoint Services 2.0, and hosts two programs one financial and one estimating for our company. We only use about 20 to 30 gigs and I maintain compression techniques on most of what we store and it runs fine but I don't want to go through the hassle or rebuilding it from scratch, sorry.

    Anyone know any companies that make good image processing backups? I looked right at Norton's site for the Ghost 12.0 but it never mentions a server NOS anywhere so I thought they may have something else or that most people are now using something else. I'm just trying to learn and any help in the right direction at this point would be great, thanks.
     
  2. cristobal03

    cristobal03

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    When I was doing enterprise work with HP we used a program called Data Protector (nee OmniBack) to perform scheduled concurrent backups on multiple servers to disk and to tape. It's probably overkill for your requirement, and I don't know how much a single license costs anymore, but all the disk in our environment was either mirrored or striped. Over SCSI directly to disk, a 30 GB backup took about 10 minutes. Over private 10/100T the speed was relatively comparable.

    HTH

    chris.
     
  3. Rockn

    Rockn

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    Ghost, Acronis and I am sure there are others. If you are thinking of removing one of the drives and using as a backup I would think otherwise. Look at off site or online backups like Sonicwall's CDP appliance or the company we use at work Digitiliti. It is pretty much set it and forget it and in case of a disaster you can recover your server to any hardware with a basic OS installation on it and be back up and in production in a couple of hours.
     
  4. djangojazz

    djangojazz Thread Starter

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    So you are against harddrive storage, any reason why? I did in the past with a Win 2000 server environment and it worked fine and checking was easy, just pop in only the copied drive, ensure it worked, pop it out put back in the active one. I am thinking of offsite storage but I would like to be in control of it by copying to a HD removeable internal bay or buying an external one and do multiple backups. From a little looking Acronis looks like it's for companies that have so much money they just would spend $800 at a drop for a backup that's worry free. I'm sorry but $800 for something that just images a copy is a little excessive.

    I'm new to online storage and I was thinking that route as well but wouldn't bandwidth create a serious lag for disaster recovery? I mean with a physical disk it's there in your hand and your limitation of speed is only the technology of the hookup via either SCSI, IDE, or SATA speed. We use a T1 and not even a full pipe speed, only 756k a sec up and down. I couldn't imagine telling everyone to wait while 25 gigs restored over a pipe at that speed at maximum effieciency that's only 756 x's 60 seconds x's 60 minutes in an hour = 2.7 gigs an hour. Only about 10 hours for a restore and even with a torrent kind of system I imagine it still couldn't be that fast for only one dedicated customer maybe 2 hours at best.

    I want something fast and cheap and preferrably not in someone's hands I have to contact and count on them. But I don't want to buy something that doesn't work. So if Norton Ghost 12 doesn't work on Win Serv 2003 I don't want it. I guess like a lot of things I will just have to do it and cross my fingers or ask some more places too. There is a first for everything I guess and change is good, thanks for the sites everyone I'll look them up and see the costs versus time versus what I can spend on time to learn and implement.
     
  5. cristobal03

    cristobal03

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    I think you're placing too much emphasis on I/O speed. For our project we found the biggest throttle was the disk itself because even using the largest possible block size and a big buffer, the disk writes couldn't keep up with the download rate. If speed is your paramount concern, you should find something to take a snapshot; that way you're up again while the dump gets stored so it doesn't matter how long the I/O requires at that point, be it SCSI, SATA, NAS, DAT, DLT, or whatever. You'll have to evaluate that against the cost of a slower recovery, but the bottom line is this: there's fast, there's cheap, and there's quality. You can only have two out of three.

    chris.
     
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