Want to use full drive capacity in NTFS drive

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ItsMe!

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Hope I’m not looking for the impossible.
I want to use full drive capacity in NTFS without reinstalling a bunch of stuff (or anything if I can help it), and without locking myself into some proprietary disk management utility (outside of MS Win itself).

I got the machine described below a couple years ago with WIN XP installed in FAT32 format in the first 31GB of drive space.

ASL Marquis C438-T Pentium IV
IntelD875PBZ/ATX/DDR400/4DIMM/ATA100/SATA150/
Intel875P/800mHz
Intel P IV Prescott 3.20gHz / Socket478/1MB L2 Cache
2 x 512MB DDR SDRAM 400mHz
Seagate Barracuda 7200.7 #120026AS 120GB SATA150
ASUS V9570/TD GeForce FX5700, 425mhz engine, 256MB DRR,
500 mhz memory, 400 mhz RAMDAC

Originally, the idea was to install another OS in the remaining disk space, but for now I won’t do that (and will buy another disk when I do). My storage requirements have increased, so 32GB won’t cut it. I thought I could reformat to NTFS (did that with convert.exe no problem), extend the existing partition to include most of the rest of the drive, and just use it. However, apparently you can’t extend a system partition, so I’m looking for a solution to make Windows act like I have one 112+/- partition.

So, what I need to know is how to use the remainder of the disk space as storage for data files in such a fashion that Windows thinks everything is still in “Documents and Settings”. How can I get the “Documents and Settings” directory into the remaining 81GB of disk space and have Windows think it’s still running off of C:\?
 

crjdriver

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You have three choices.

1 Backup what you want and do a clean install using all of the disk.

2 Use a third party app like acronis or PM to resize the partition.

3 Use a linux disk to resize the partition.

In any case make sure you backup anything important before you start this task.
 

crjdriver

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Just reread your post. If all you want to do is move the my docs folder, that is pretty easy. Just make a new partition and format in disk management. Now assign the my docs folder to the F, G or whatever letter the new partition is.

This leaves you with more than one partition, however it does not cost anything;) ;)
 

ItsMe!

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crjdriver said:
Just reread your post. If all you want to do is move the my docs folder, that is pretty easy. Just make a new partition and format in disk management. Now assign the my docs folder to the F, G or whatever letter the new partition is.

This leaves you with more than one partition, however it does not cost anything;) ;)
Regarding the 3 choices mentioned in your original reply, I'm reconsidering my opposition to partitioning software. I don't want to get locked into an application to maintain my partitions, but I (think I) understand that I could even uninstall the partitioning software if I wanted, and the extended system partition would remain intact at the new, say, 110 GB size. Is that your understanding as well?
I've come to distrust and despise Symantec, so PM is not a serious contender.
You also mentioned Acronis. They have a downloadable $50 Disk Director Suite 10.0, and offer a downloadable trial version. What is your experience with Acronis?

Thank-you,
Matt (ItsMe!)
 

Noyb

Jay
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I agree with Crjdriver (post #3) … and also vote for Acronis.
I’ve found that Acronis Disc Director will work when Partition Magic wont.
It’s his fault that I found out about Acronis in the first place. :) Glad I listened.

But - I would suggest getting Acronis True Image - save the $50 for the Acronis Disc Director - and put it toward a new (maybe larger) HD.
Leave your C: system OS partition small - and put your stored data in another partition.
It sounds like you can do this with windows easily.

Acronis TI home page with information …
http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/products/trueimage/
$30 … from here …
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E1681279691SF


You can then use Acronis True Image to build up a new HD (from your old HD) - Partitioned anyway you want, eliminating the need for risky partitioning software … or burning any bridges (HDs) behind you.
ATI also works very well with external HDs … which are a “must have” nowadays.

Small system partitions (containing only the OS) .. are easier/quicker to defrag, backup, restore, scan for Malware and just seem to run faster.
Besides - IMO - Backing up an C: OS system and Data are two different procedures and purposes, so they belong in two different partitions.
 

crjdriver

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If you buy another drive as suggested above, you will not need any partitioning apps. You can partition and format the drive from disk management in windows. You can buy an 80 gig drive for the price of disk director.

You can also use the extra drive for image backups. Download the trial version of acronis true image and see if you like it.
 

Noyb

Jay
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Update ... 100 gig SATA at Frys this week for $59 .. no rebates needed.
He should be able to do a lot with a dual bootable system.
 

ItsMe!

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cjdriver & noyb,
Thanks for the expert advice and kind assistance.
I got the Acronis DD Suite a couple days ago. I downloaded the trial demo first, which was pretty and easy, but the freebie wouldn't let me "commit" the changes. Seems they actually wanted their money before they were willing to be useful :) .
Anyhow, the real thing worked nicely. Thanks for the tip.
BTW, I did look at True Image, but with my current configuration, I don't need it yet. I may get an enclosure for external configuration of a 120 GB IDE drive from my old Dell, but I don't know. For now, I'll just continue to rely on the 10/20 Travan.

I may get another internal drive, but not right now. My current is an SATA, and I'd almost certainly get another SATA for installation into the machine when I decide I need one. When I bought the machine, the guy wanted to sell me a backplane. Since I didn't want the management issues that can come with RAID (I could never even remember what those numbers for the RAID levels stood for), I declined the backplane.

So, now, if you don't mind, I have another question(s).
Do I need a backplane to install a second SATA drive?
If so, then is there a standard backplane configuration you can just pick up, or are there machine specs I need to know about my box/mboard to select one?

I have the space for another drive, and if another SATA is impractical for some reason(s) in the answer(s) to the above, then I assume I can just put an IDE drive in there?

Thanks
 

crjdriver

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You should have at least two sata connectors on your mb. Just use the unused connector to connect a second drive. You should not need to buy an add-in card unless you do not have any other sata connectors on the board.

The best way to tell is to open the case and give it a look.

BTW true image will make image files to tape drives as well.
 
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