watching Bush tonight

plschwartz

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Whatever your political view you wlll have the opportunity to watch what the finest minds in image control can devise. He is said to be a very good learner at this.
We all use body language cues to try and determine the speakers real emotional state. These have all been carefully studied and body language can be taught. Every pol who goes on TV should or does do this. Bush is said to have some of the best image managers.

Try this during his speech. Turn off the sound and watch him. See what They want you to see him as, what product they are trying to sell.
Of course the whole direction has been planned with the care of a class 1 commercial. If you can watch the camera choices and cuts. They can make him into the man the want you to see him as.

Is it any coincidence that the first Viagra spokesman was a seasoned pol?
 

EdGreene

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Originally posted by plschwartz:
Whatever your political view you wlll have the opportunity to watch what the finest minds in image control can devise. He is said to be a very good learner at this.
We all use body language cues to try and determine the speakers real emotional state. These have all been carefully studied and body language can be taught. Every pol who goes on TV should or does do this. Bush is said to have some of the best image managers.

Try this during his speech. Turn off the sound and watch him. See what They want you to see him as, what product they are trying to sell.
Of course the whole direction has been planned with the care of a class 1 commercial. If you can watch the camera choices and cuts. They can make him into the man the want you to see him as.

Is it any coincidence that the first Viagra spokesman was a seasoned pol?
Me, watch up to 40 minutes of lies and spins on what Junior and his dirty henchmen say?

"I'd rather", as Princess Leah once said: "...kiss a Wookie!"
 
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Originally posted by plschwartz:
Try this during his speech. Turn off the sound and watch him.
I recommend all liberals do this--listening to the facts will confuse you! ;)
 

Stoner

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Whether you're for or against him, watch Bush's eyes when he talks,then turn the sound off!
Want spooky, look again at his eyes, he's brain dead from his 'alleged' drug filled youth. Then turn the sound back on and enjoy the ramblings. :)
 

plschwartz

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Part II is to then watch the rerun and listen to how the words and music go together. It aint grand opera or even grand ole opera but it is an art form with a wonderful endowment
 

eggplant43

A True Heart and Soul - Gone But Never Forgotten
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I think there's a very simple question we can all ask ourselves this evening. Would I buy a used car from this man?
 
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Originally posted by eggplant43:
I think there's a very simple question we can all ask ourselves this evening. Would I buy a used car from this man?
Of course you wouldn't. You'd expect him to give you the car!! ;)
 

eggplant43

A True Heart and Soul - Gone But Never Forgotten
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Of course you wouldn't. You'd expect him to give you the car!!
And you'd expect to pay cash for the car, and then get back 110% of the cost of the purchase in tax reduction, tax incentives et al.;)
 
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I really don't need to listen to any more B.uS.h. ;) More smoke and mirrors. He says that there's new evidence for going to war but he won't tell you now. Still waiting for the old evidence.

As for the economy it's general knowledge that no ones going to get into a spending/hiring mode with a war hanging overhead.
 

eggplant43

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January 28, 2003

A Credibility Problem

By PAUL KRUGMAN


Will tonight's State of the Union address restore George W. Bush's political fortunes?

Only a few weeks ago, that would have seemed an extremely unlikely question. Fresh off the Republican victory in the midterm elections, President Bush seemed invincible — and it's amazing how many stories you still read about his immense, unshakeable popularity.

But anyone who takes the trouble to look at the numbers knows that the thrill is gone. Mr. Bush's approval ratings have plunged over the last two months. A year ago he was, indeed, immensely popular; right now he's not significantly more popular than he was before Sept. 11.

Other polls suggest that the public is particularly disenchanted with Mr. Bush's economic policy. Most voters no longer believe that his tax cuts are effective at creating jobs, and many also believe that his policies favor the wealthy and large corporations, rather than people like themselves. (Class warfare!)

Still, polls can shift — as they did, suddenly, after Sept. 11. Can tonight's speech do the trick?

We can be sure that some pundits will acclaim the speech as bold and brilliant; they would do that if he read from "The Very Hungry Caterpillar." Whether their praise, and the theatrics of the occasion, will turn things around is anyone's guess. A lot depends on whether Mr. Bush is held accountable for the promises he made in his last State of the Union address.

For there was more to that speech than the axis of evil (a phrase, by the way, that has vanished from Mr. Bush's vocabulary, along with the name of that guy he promised to bring in dead or alive). He assured those who worried about red ink that "our budget will run a deficit that will be small and short-lived." He offered comfort for those who remembered his father's "jobless recovery," which felt like a continuing recession: "When America works, America prospers, so my economic security plan can be summed up in one word: jobs."

Fast-forward a year. We now know that the "small" budget deficit will rise above $300 billion, and stay there. Even the administration's own, ever-optimistic budget officials now concede that we face deficits as far as the eye can see. Meanwhile, payrolls continue to decline; since the working-age population keeps rising, it's becoming ever harder for ordinary Americans to get jobs, or keep them.

And there's a good chance things will get a lot worse: with markets sliding, consumers wilting, businesses fearful about the effects of war and oil prices rising, the pieces are in place for a full-blown double-dip recession. And the second dip would take us much further down than the first.

So can Mr. Bush convince us that his latest tax cut is just the tonic the economy needs?

There are several reasons to doubt whether he can pull it off. For one thing, economists outside the administration, even those who always find ways to praise whatever he proposes, can't see what this tax cut has to do with the economy's immediate problems. This has led to a striking dissonance between what administration officials say on TV — where it's still all about jobs — and what they say when speaking to knowledgeable audiences. In background briefings for reporters, at the Davos conference this past weekend and wherever else they encounter people who might actually know something about the numbers, officials now pooh-pooh concerns about the state of the job market. Never mind that, they say, our plan is all about increasing long-run growth. Um, but what about "economic security"?

The administration's credibility problem is made worse by the high casualty rate among top economic officials, and the uninspiring quality of their replacements. Today is the first day of hearings for John Snow, the administration's choice for Treasury secretary. One official I spoke to was rueful: "I thought Paul O'Neill wasn't suited to being Treasury secretary; he'd have been better off running a railroad. Now they've picked a man who ran a railroad."

But that's not why he was chosen, according to CBS Market Watch: "He was picked because he's a lobbyist, a schmoozer, a master salesman" — and a member of no fewer than nine country clubs.

Still, nobody razzle-dazzles 'em like Mr. Bush. Tonight we'll see if he's good enough to make us forget last year's promises.
 

angelize56

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Leave your sets on and sound on and just give the man a chance! I suppose it's easy for people to knock the President...but would you like to be in his shoes and have the fate of a nation and possibly the world in your hands as he does? I sure wouldn't! As a Christian I know everything is in God's hands anyway. I pray the President chooses the right path for us. Just my <b>opinion</b>. :) Take care. Marlene (angel)

WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Bush, confronting an ailing economy and the prospect of war in Iraq, declared he will "rally the American people to some great causes" in Tuesday night's State of the Union address.

Hours before the speech to Congress and a global television audience, Bush said, "Tonight I will talk about the great challenges that face our country. I have no doubt we will be able to handle those challenges because we are a great country."

Bush did not mention Iraq - only his "deep desire for peace" at home and in the world's trouble spots. He said his address will also lay out a vision for improving health care, improving the economy and helping Americans help each other.

"It is a moment where I will rally the American people to some great causes and remind them that we will accomplish those causes together," he said after meeting with his Cabinet.

Senate Democratic Leader Tom Daschle challenged the White House to show "proof to the world" that Iraq has weapons of mass destruction. He and House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi accused Bush of creating a "credibility gap" on a raft of issues.

Washington Gov. Gary Locke, who will deliver the Democratic response to Bush's speech, said no economic recovery can occur until the states and cities receive help from Washington - something that was omitted from Bush's economic proposals.

"People are clearly worried about terrorism and Iraq but those concerns should not overshadow the pressing needs of the people here at home," he said.

<b>A senior White House official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said Bush will use one or two new pieces of recently unclassified intelligence to outline his case against Iraq, asserting that Saddam has weapons of mass destruction and ties to terrorist groups. Bush will argue that America can't wait until the threat matures to the point that it's too late to contain Saddam.</b>

Though he won't declare war, the president's intentions will be clear that Bush's patience is limited, the aide said.

Much of Bush's speech will focus on domestic concerns, officials said.

Pushing a new plank in his "faith-based initiative," Bush is asking Congress to direct drug treatment dollars to religious organizations. His plan would give addicts treatment vouchers that would allow them to seek help at any center, including those with religious approaches, two senior White House officials said.

Per tradition, a guest box in the galleries overlooking the House chamber will be hosted by the first lady and filled with living testimonials to the president's message.

This year's roster of guests to join Laura Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney's wife, Lynne, included half a dozen people who would benefit from Bush's tax-cut proposal, two doctors slammed by high malpractice insurance costs, several people who work for or run aid organizations and a sister and sister-in-law of the president. One gallery seat was to be left empty to symbolize "the empty place many Americans will always have" because of the September 2001 attacks.

Hours before Bush was to stand before Congress and a global television audience, spokesman Ari Fleischer said the address will focus half on domestic policy and half on national security. Polls show Americans are increasingly unsure about Bush's handling of the U.S. economy and want more evidence of Saddam's weapons of mass destruction.

"The president has not made a case to go to war with Iraq," Fleischer told reporters. "The president has made a case about the serious threat Saddam Hussein presents."

He said Bush would take "further steps" at a later time to justify war, if necessary. He also said the president was confident that Americans would rally behind him once they know all the facts.

On the domestic front, Bush's voucher plan for drug treatment is sure to be controversial because many religious drug treatment programs do not employ medical approaches and do not use staff that have been licensed for this work. It would cost $200 million in the next fiscal year.

The officials said Bush also planned to propose a significant increase in spending on research of hydrogen fuel-cell cars, part of an expansion of a program he announced in November.

His domestic agenda also includes new tax cuts, prescription drug assistance for the elderly, health insurance for people employed by small businesses and other new initiatives that help religious groups provide federally funded community services.

Balancing domestic and international issues in the speech will be like forcing "10 pounds of stuff into a five-pound bag," said Ken Khachigian, who wrote speeches for presidents Nixon and Reagan.

"He's got a lot on the agenda, but I think there are two things that are pressing, so there are two things you focus on - <b>Iraq, homeland security and the economy",</b> (isn't that three things? Kidding! angel)) Khachigian said. "What I think he has to do is keep it simple and keep it focused."

The Bush administration has readied a proposal to offer prescription drug benefits and catastrophic illness coverage to seniors for the first time as an inducement to leave the traditional fee-for-service Medicare program and join private but government-subsidized health care plans, according to officials working on the plan.
 

plschwartz

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angelize:
I wasn't suggesting we not listen to him, I will on re-run and maybe if I get tired of observing.
But it will be a masterful selling job. Yhey have already had 4 dress rehearsals. Image manipulation is part of the game. Bushs' is much better than say Dashell. It is certainly an art form. I watch good comercials over and over w/o sound just to see the technique.

One of the things I noticed last year is that on some points he verbally stress, his body language was neutral . I think this may have been to lessen the emotional memory of this.
I dont have the concentration to do the entire speech, but I will check out body language on SocSec reform which I think he has to back down a little from.
 

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