1. Computer problem? Tech Support Guy is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations. Click here to join today! If you're new to Tech Support Guy, we highly recommend that you visit our Guide for New Members.

Web Design/Programming Pricing...

Discussion in 'Software Development' started by Gibble, Jan 14, 2004.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Advertisement
  1. Gibble

    Gibble Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2001
    Messages:
    27,087
    Ok, I work as a programmer, and virtually everything I do is web application programming in ASP, .NET, etc...

    Anyhow, I want to start moonlighting, but oddly my stumbling block isn't so much finding customers, it's knowing what to charge, and how to break it down for them.

    Yes, I can tell someone it will $800 (or whatever), but I want to show them how I come to that price, or why it's a good price, because it's cheaper than if they paid for all the things I'd do individually.

    Basically, I'm currently just looking for design websites that show what they charge for each of their services, and how they break down everything.

    If you are a web designer, can you let me know how you break down your bill, or if you've had work done, let me know how you were charged. Or if you're bored and want to do a little surfing and see what you can come up with :)

    It would help immensely. :D

    Thanks
    --Gibbs
     
  2. Gibble

    Gibble Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2001
    Messages:
    27,087
    *bump*
     
  3. brendandonhu

    brendandonhu

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2002
    Messages:
    14,681
    Usually I estimate how many lines of code I will have to write. If its a small, simple project that any coder could do, I may charge less than a cent per line of code. For a larger, complicated project that required work & debugging I have gone as high as 6 cents per line of code. I don't actually charge the customer per line, I just estimate how long the program or script will be and give the person my quote. Of course, I'm an inexpensive coder so your approximate price/line will probably be higher.
     
  4. Gibble

    Gibble Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2001
    Messages:
    27,087
    Charging by line of code doesn't make much sense.

    Considering I can write things that take me weeks/months and in the end only have a few thousand lines of code, because while some people spend their time writing lines of code.

    Charging by the hour is ok for some things, but clients want to see where that time is spent.

    If they just want a simple 5 page static presence. What do I charge. And if I say $400, they don't realize how good a deal that really is, yes I 'could' knock something off in 30 minutes, but it would just be their content stuffed into a template, and just another cookie cutter website.

    Or I could spend a couple days making a custom design, doing graphics, etc.
     
  5. brendandonhu

    brendandonhu

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2002
    Messages:
    14,681
    Maybe it works for me because most of my projects take 1-2 days, for long term projects maybe it doesn't make much sense.
     
  6. Gibble

    Gibble Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2001
    Messages:
    27,087
    Plus the fact you don't need to make as much as I do...

    ...let me do the math here...

    My last program, which was a few dozen xml and asp files is still less than a meg (not including graphics or the database)

    ...it took six months.

    The largest file is just over 2000 lines, and most average about a 100 lines...so it's only about 10,000 lines at most, probably less.

    So, to make what I did in those 6 months I'd have to charge...

    WOW...I don't I'll be posting what I'd charge per line ;) Nobody would want me to hit the enter key :p
     
  7. CyBerAliEn

    CyBerAliEn

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2001
    Messages:
    1,209
    Gibble:

    There are a number of ways that different individuals do this sort of thing. Though what I am going to suggest is the most likely, and you likely already have an "overview" of each.

    I use to do web design for the company I currently work for, and still do it sort of on the side as a "hobby", lol...




    Suggestion One
    Charge by the hour.

    Out of my two suggestions, this would be the one I would suggest you go with.

    You've probably made a decent amount of scripts and full websites by now, and encountered different problems and roadblocks along the way. So you probably have an idea as to what to expect during a project.

    So consider how long a website may take you. Figure out what a client wants and what their project will entail. You should probably get a good idea about how long it will take you to do it; whether that be only a day or two, a week, a few weeks, a month or two, etc.

    Also, I’m not really sure how much experience you’ve had (IE, dealt with a series of individual clients, or have worked under an employer mostly), but just be aware that your typical client will probably ask you to do one thing, or say they want something one way; but to change their mind and do it the other way after you finished doing it the one way. You may or may not really have experienced this, it is extremely frustrating at times; but be prepared with your estimates in time and price for this sort of thing.

    So now you basically have the first part down, how long it should take you to do the site.

    Now as to what to do for the pricing is sort of the next part. This is really up to you. You can do something like $10 an hour, no exceptions or anything. If the project will take say 60 hours, then you would charge $600.

    Now if the client wants a little more detail as to how that is, that may be a little tricky. For one, it is really impossible to make your typical client get an idea of what goes into a website (time, work, complexity, etc). To them, it really comes down to about three things; how long it will take for the site to be fully operational and online, how much it will cost them, and how much they like the design of the site.

    Now something you could do is something like: Obviously when you are working, record your time and the kind of work you did. Then on your bill for them, separate it out to be something like:

    Basic HTML Work @ $8.00 per hour
    Graphics Work @ $16.00 per hour
    Database Setup/Entry/Work @ $25.00 per hour
    Basic Scripting Work @ $16.00 per hour
    Advanced Scripting Work @ $30.00 per hour
    Other Misc. Work @ $20.00 per hour

    The above of course is just an example with some numbers I threw out of my head (putting sort of the lowest rate with the simplest/easiest job, and putting the highest with the hardest/advanced job).

    It may also be worth adding a “setup” fee. Maybe something like $50, $100, $200, etc. If you did something like this, basically you would charge anyone that $50/$100/etc amount and then add on the amount for the hours worked. Because it is possible that you may get business from someone who just wants a simple graphic made (which may only take half an hour for example); etc.

    By doing something like the above, you could show a client basically how the work is distributed (IE, 4 hours basic HTML, 5 hour database, 3 hours scripting, etc). You could also explain forehand, or in the bill in some way, what kind of work is defined in each example. For example, filling in “static content” would be basic HTML work; setting up database tables would be database work; entering data into a database would be database work; etc. But you will need to be very clear in what “requirements” must be met for work to be placed in any category. Otherwise I’m sure some might feel or get an idea that your just putting most of your time in the highest paying rate; etc.

    Hopefully this should give you an idea to sort of go off on.




    Suggestion Two
    Charging per page.

    I wouldn’t recommend doing this myself.

    Many places will have “packages” setup. Such as: so much graphics work included, so many pages included, etc; for a total of X.

    These range something like 8 pages, 50 unique graphics, etc; for $300; etc.

    Not a good way to do design in my opinion. These sorts of things usually range from like a 5 page site to like a 40 page site. With low end pricing usually at about $200, and possibly going into the thousands (though unlikely to exceed $3,000, or even $2,000).




    How much a website costs can’t really be said with certainty, because there is a wide difference really between each designer. You should decide on what is comfortable for you and what you will be able to live on (if a full time thing), and what you feel your work is worth. However, every website usually has a range that you could place it in for how much it should cost. I could look at a website and tell you that it should have cost $200 to $500, $500 to $800, etc. However, that gets hard when you run into “dynamic” sties (works with a database, etc); because then there is a lot of the site and work done for the site that you don’t see, you only see the small result of.

    To maybe help give you an idea, one of my websites (www.ws.planetubh.com) I had the design and graphics done by a design firm. What I got as an end result are exactly what you see in the below images. I of course only wanted a “template” of my own to use because I am not that great with graphics, lol…

    http://www.planetubh.com/core/permtemp/pubhws_design1.jpg
    http://www.planetubh.com/core/permtemp/pubhws_design2.jpg

    I was charged $200 total of the whole thing. The design, the graphics made (note that several graphics done are not featured in the images above), etc. I went in and added all the coding, content, etc myself.


    If your not sure about what to do, feel free to ask. I’ll be more than willing to give you advice if you so request. Hope this post isn’t too long, lol… Typing it out in MS Word because I can lose thought if I do it in that little box at TSG, and it is currently close to going onto a 4th page.


    Andrew
     
  8. CyBerAliEn

    CyBerAliEn

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2001
    Messages:
    1,209
    Gibble:

    Sort of to add onto Suggestion One...


    If you find yourself doing a project that is going to take a long time (more than just a few weeks), charge the client in a certain interval for the work.

    I'm sure you probably have an idea as to this, but if not, maybe it will help a little more.

    If you start a design work in like early September, your still working on it.... it is now October, bill the client for all the work you did during the month of September. This would do a few things. One, you would get compensated for that work done in a relatively reasonable amount of time. Two, the client would get a much better idea as to how much work was completed (and where it was completed if you did like a custom rates thing) because it would still be very close to September, and they would look at the bill and be able to be all "OK... it is X for everything he got done in September"... instead of a few months later "Wow... how did that get so high? I don't remember that much work being done...."; etc.


    Andrew
     
  9. Sponsor

As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 733,556 other people just like you!

Loading...
Similar Threads - Design Programming Pricing
  1. Couriant
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    1,555
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Short URL to this thread: https://techguy.org/195186

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice