1. Computer problem? Tech Support Guy is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations. Click here to join today! If you're new to Tech Support Guy, we highly recommend that you visit our Guide for New Members.

What is V bonded DSL? Advice on best modem for it

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by ArchxxAngel, Jul 17, 2019.

Advertisement
  1. ArchxxAngel

    ArchxxAngel Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2019
    Messages:
    4
    Hello to the amazing people who offer free help!

    I currently have Windstream DSL internet and was able to upgrade from 50 megs to 100 megs. They told me I don't need a different modem for this change but I have been renting their modem/router for over 2 years and want to get my own (a really good one along with a router that can manage 2 Playstation Pros gaming online at the same time without a hiccup). When I upgraded the internet speed I talked to tech support about buying my own modem. I had read that the type of modem has to match the type of DSL. I asked if it was ADSL or VDSL. The only thing he could tell me is that it is V bonded. I asked if that means that it is bonded VDSL but he would only answer that it is V bonded. I searched the internet and can't find any info on "V bonded" DSL.

    Can anyone shed any light on what exactly V bonded means?
    Can you please give me some suggestions on the best modem, router, or combo that will work the best with it? I'm not looking for the cheapest option; just the best performing and most reliable one.

    Thank you :)
     
  2. Oddba11

    Oddba11

    Joined:
    May 12, 2011
    Messages:
    7,620
    First Name:
    Jim
    My advice would be to contact support again (or visit their webpage) and see which models their service supports. Then choose the "best" from their list. While any modem should work, that isn't always the case.
     
  3. plodr

    plodr

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    17,649
    First Name:
    Liz
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2019
  4. ArchxxAngel

    ArchxxAngel Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2019
    Messages:
    4
    Great, thanks for your help. I continued doing some research and found a couple on Ebay that should work but still don't actually know what Vbonded means (best I could find is probably bonded vdsl). Since then I've been researching MoCA networks and was about to buy the adapters but decided to check all the coax first. I got a cable tester yesterday and got the VDV Scout Pro 2 by KIein Tools. I was having no luck finding any cables that didn't show a short or open signal. I looked at the line going into the modem/router again (in the basement) and it is a CAT5e, traced this to the old security system. From there I have no clue where the actual entry point is. I tested all the cables at the old Satellite dish but they weren't showing anything except short and open. I even went to the attic and tested cables (stifling hot up there!). I actually traced 3 of the cables to inside the house with the cable tester but none of them were actually hooked up anywhere. There were a couple I didn't test that were attached to a 4 way splitter (one of the ports was just capped without a cable in it) because I was so hot, needed a wrench, and it was late last night.

    I still want to try the MoCA network and plan to go back up into the attic to look for more cables and test the few I didn't get to (this time with wrench in hand). Hopefully I'll find the likely point of entry. Is there a likely entry point when the CAT5e cable is attached to a security system?

    Keep in mind I'm not very technologically savvy lol
     
  5. plodr

    plodr

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    17,649
    First Name:
    Liz
    Haven't a clue. Our security system is very old school with a key to turn it off and on and a dialer to the phone that dials out when it is tripped. Nothing like Cat 5.
     
  6. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2008
    Messages:
    6,106
    If the security system is wired correctly, there should be some sort of line interrupt configuration where the security system can take over the phone line to call out to the central monitoring station. My ADT system is wired this way. I don't remember how I traced everything but I did it in such a way to be able to wire in a whole house surge protector which not only protects against surges on the incoming power but also the phone line and cable. I also took advantage of the situation and wired in a single DSL filter which covers all the analog phones in the house negating the need to have a filter at each phone. I've since moved on to cable so all the stuff I've done for DSL is no longer needed.

    With regards to MoCA, if you have RG6 coax cabling, you should be good to go. I'm running DirecTV's version of it to network all my DVRs together. Haven't had an issue at all.
     
  7. ArchxxAngel

    ArchxxAngel Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2019
    Messages:
    4
    Thanks for the replies. I did check the other cables but alas they registered open or short but I labeled the ones I could trace with tape for future use. Still can't find the POE for the dsl. There has to be one right? Even though the CAT cable is hooked to the security system? The security system isn't even being used and idk if it even works.
    Ugh, I'm probably in over my head already but I have that need to finish things I start.
     
  8. Oddba11

    Oddba11

    Joined:
    May 12, 2011
    Messages:
    7,620
    First Name:
    Jim
    DSL will use a standard phone line. If the power and utilities are above ground, then start outside and trace the phone line into the home.

    VDSL: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VDSL
     
  9. ArchxxAngel

    ArchxxAngel Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2019
    Messages:
    4
    I finally got the MoCA network up and running. This was about to give me a stroke. I located enough cables in home and in the attic to trace one to the basement to connect to the MoCA adapter in the basement with the main modem/router where the DSL cat5e is connected. The cable I put in the MoCA adapter led to the attic so I put a POE filter on it and attached it to the main feed of a splitter. Then attached the attic cable I found to my bedroom to the splitter and one other cable for the living room. I attached the bedroom cable to the wifi extender. Everything is working except that the upload speeds are consistently lower with the MoCA network. I wonder if I need a POE filter at the wireless extender? I used a 4 way splitter that is up to 2150 MHz (that's all I had on hand) in the attic but only used 2 of the ports. Could that cause problems? The splitter was used previously with the pre-existing Satellite (that is not being used) and cables that I used for my MoCA network.
    I'm frankly surprised I've gotten this far, ugh this stuff is confusing.
     
  10. Sponsor

As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 733,556 other people just like you!

Loading...

Short URL to this thread: https://techguy.org/1230159

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice