What Linux for my laptop?

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OM2

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I want to try out Linux on my laptop

Which should I use?
I was just going to go for Ubuntu - since I had heard of this one

I did a quick search and the options seem to be looads!
NimbleX?? Is that any good? Is this JUST for portable - only asking for this one because it had most downloads on a page I looked at

What would you recommend?

Thanks


OM
 

leroys1000

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Ubuntu is still a good choice for an overall distribution.
Your laptop should be able to handle it easy.
For a desktop that is a bit more windows like,try kubuntu.
It is ubuntu with the kde desktop.
 

OM2

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thanks for the replies guys
i tried ubuntu 18 months ago booting from a cd
i really didnt like the interface
so, i might give kubuntu a go
 

aka Brett

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They do look different..the navigation is a little different as well
Both versions are customizable as far as appearance etc
 
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Personally I prefer OpenSuse, but to each his own. If you want a great website that shows the most major distributions, check out Distrowatch.
 
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GNOME (The default Ubuntu interface) has changed quite a bit in the last 18 months so it might be worth another try. You can switch between GNOME and KDE in the Ubuntu log-in screen.
 

OM2

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dell 1525, 4gb ram, dual core 2.4ghz, onboard graphics
to be honest, i think i'll go with the masses and choose ubuntu
 
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Ah.
There are loads of choices. If Ubuntu isn't to your liking another distro is just a web search away. :)
 
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Ubuntu is a great distro to start. Easy to use, as well as powered by Debian. There's also Mint, OpenSuse, Fedora, PCLinuxOS, Mandriva, Debian... etc. I suggest try Ubuntu. If you don't like it, try some of its variants or try one of the others I listed... or anything else you can find! There are thousands of distros.
 
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thanks for the replies guys
i tried ubuntu 18 months ago booting from a cd
i really didnt like the interface
so, i might give kubuntu a go
Please do not take this reply in the wrong way. I'm trying to be helpful and not trying to put you down. That said, "I didn't like the interface" is a senseless response. Sure, IMO, when you boot the Ubuntu LiveCD, the desktop you see is downright ugly. But that is just my opinion. Others find it quite attractive.

But so what? There are literally hundreds of other desktop backgrounds and themes to choose from. You can make your desktop look any way you want it to.

Let's assume you weren't talking about the "way it looks" but, rather, "the way it works." Most of the time when people say this all they mean is that it doesn't work just the way they are used to doing things. If this is the case, then you have to weigh your reasons for wanting to use it 'cause there IS going to be a "period of adjustment". No distro is going work for you if you aren't willing to use it long enough to become comfortable with how it works, because there is no distro that does things the way you are used to doing them.

Then again, one of the things about Linux is that there are so many different ways of doing anything, that, if you spend the time learning it, you can customize your installation to do things the way YOU want to do them. But that is the key. You can't boot a LiveCD and find one that you like "out of the box". Like anything worthwhile, you have to invest time and effort to produce something you are happy with.

My advice to anyone wanting to try Linux for the first time is to install VirtualBox in their Windows computer. Using Vbox, you can try as many different Linux distros as your heart desires. And you can do so without endangering your productivity. This way you can take as much time as necessary to learn Linux and become comfortable with it, BEFORE you even consider "switching".
 
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