While overclocking something in my system was damaged.

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Kosner

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I had a stable 4.4GHz overclock on my i5 4690K for a week or two but decided to try for 4.5 today. After a couple of bsod I tried to up the voltage a little bit (was moving from 1.268 to 1.27) but when I rebooted to test it out I was greeted with an Asus splash screen that mentioned CPU overvoltage so I quickly shutdown. When I tried to boot back up all I got was a black screen and the fans going. After about 10 seconds it shut itself down.. I'm afraid I may have accidentally fried the poor thing, the only thing I can think of is accidentally putting 1.7 instead of 1.27 but I'd like to think the BIOS would prevent that (right..?) I've tried the normal stuff like unplugging everything and draining the PSU but it didn't help. Also removed the motherboard battery to reset BIOS and that fixed the PC from shutting itself down but it still boots to a black screen. Did I really kill it? Any advice, suggestion, or ridicule is welcome.

I've tried resetting the bios/cmos, booting without GPU, booting without GPU or Ram (also with just one, no beeps but I probably need a motherboard speaker for that.) Keyboard and mouse aren't lighting up but CPU/Radiator fan is at a constant speed, GPU fans aren't going at all. Monitor always says no DVI signal. Motherboard (Asus Z97-E 3.1) doesn't seem to have any post led indicators :/ Standby power is always green, fancy motherboard outline (normally yellow) doesn't light. PC self reboots after 20 or so seconds.

Parts:
I5 4690K
Asus Z97-E 3.1
Corsair M2 750W Gold+
 

crjdriver

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Did you reset cmos with the jumper or just by pulling the battery?
How to properly clear cmos or in asus speak RTC
1 System OFF, pull the pw cord from the rear of the pw supply
2 Press the ON button 2~3 times. This removes any residual charge from the pw supply capacitors
3 Clear cmos or RTC with the jumper for at least 10 seconds
4 Replace jumper to the normal or keep position
5 Replace the pw cord and pw ON. See if you get a display

If not, then shutdown again and pull the pw connectors from ALL drives; both hd and optical. You list a M.2 drive so remove the m.2. Disconnect any usb device ie printer, scanner, hub, etc. Pull out your video card and connect the monitor to the onchip or onboard port on the back of the motherboard. Now attempt another pw ON. If it still does not work, then you are going to have to swap parts with known good units ie motherboard, ram, cpu.

I have a saying. "There is NO safe overclock. Do not overclock with parts you cannot afford to replace"
 

Kosner

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Oct 23, 2013
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Did you reset cmos with the jumper or just by pulling the battery?
How to properly clear cmos or in asus speak RTC
1 System OFF, pull the pw cord from the rear of the pw supply
2 Press the ON button 2~3 times. This removes any residual charge from the pw supply capacitors
3 Clear cmos or RTC with the jumper for at least 10 seconds
4 Replace jumper to the normal or keep position
5 Replace the pw cord and pw ON. See if you get a display

If not, then shutdown again and pull the pw connectors from ALL drives; both hd and optical. You list a M.2 drive so remove the m.2. Disconnect any usb device ie printer, scanner, hub, etc. Pull out your video card and connect the monitor to the onchip or onboard port on the back of the motherboard. Now attempt another pw ON. If it still does not work, then you are going to have to swap parts with known good units ie motherboard, ram, cpu.

I have a saying. "There is NO safe overclock. Do not overclock with parts you cannot afford to replace"
My board has two clear pins instead that I've tried shorting with and without the CMOS battery inside. Replacing something isn't bad it's just a pain to figure out what to replace, I'd like to think it's the CPU but those are supposed to be tough.

I'll try booting with minimal hardware and see how that goes.
 
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Kosner

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Good luck. Let us know if you are successful.
I tried booting with minimal hardware (CPU, PSU, Motherboard and RAM) but still no DVI signal. A friend of mine still has his old i5 I can borrow to test in a few days but is there anything else I can do now to narrow down the problem?
 

crjdriver

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Not really. At this point, you need to start swapping parts. CPUs are generally pretty hard to hurt unless you overvolt them or physically damage the cpu during installation. It you upped vcore by only .1V, then that should not hurt the processor however no guarantee.
Many boards use an offset to increase vcore. If this is the case with your board and you typed in 1.28V or whatever, understand that is additional voltage ie it is added to the stock vcore. For a board that does this, you would type in .1V and that would increase vcore by that amount under a full load.
 

Kosner

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What I think happened is that when I tried to increase the voltage from 1.268 to 1.27 I accidentally typed 1.7 instead which definitely would explain the CPU over voltage splash screen I received. I'd like to think my motherboard BIOS wouldn't actually let that happen without an additional confirmation or setting though.

Would it be worth ordering a motherboard speaker to try and troubleshoot in the mean time?
 

crjdriver

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Sure. A speaker is only approx $4
https://www.newegg.com/Product/Prod...otherboard_speaker-_-9SIA2973FN4939-_-Product
You can pull out the ram and cpu. See if you get a beep from the board.
I'd like to think my motherboard BIOS wouldn't actually let that happen without an additional confirmation or setting though.
If whatever you typed in was within the allowable parameters of the bios, it is not going to give you any other warning. There is usually a warning of some type that increasing voltages can cause component failure however that is a pretty general warning.
 

Kosner

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I'll order one then it'll be useful to have around anyways.

If whatever you typed in was within the allowable parameters of the bios, it is not going to give you any other warning.
Are those parameters generally something that I can change? I know my bios has an "extreme voltage" option but it was always disabled, Id think 1.7 would fall under that but maybe not.

I appreciate your help so far I'll be sure to post back!
 

crjdriver

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Just as an example, the motherboard I use in this system is an asrock gaming board. It allows you to choose what method of cpu voltage you want to use ie fixed vcore, auto, or offset. I get the best result from using offset and applying a .1V value. This 7600K is running @4.6 prime95 and IBT stable.
You really have to look at the bios options to be sure of what you are increasing and how much it increases.
As a general rule, I REALLY dislike the auto overclock feature that is available on many boards. When I first built this system, I tried the AUTO overclock. It works ok however [IMO] auto ups vcore too much. The board put vcore @1.38V or so to achieve the OC. By setting everything manually, I can get the same OC with vcore @1.30V and it runs cooler. IBT was hitting 75C with auto overclock and now runs 65-70C with manual settings.
 

crjdriver

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I'll order one then it'll be useful to have around anyways.



Are those parameters generally something that I can change? I know my bios has an "extreme voltage" option but it was always disabled, Id think 1.7 would fall under that but maybe not.

I appreciate your help so far I'll be sure to post back!
No, you are not going to change the range of voltage selection. While it is technically possible to do this, doing so would require you to mod the actual bios file with an editor then flash the bios with the modded file. This is a task that requires a VERY high level of skill and is beyond the ability of just about all computer users. Many years ago I had to write some custom bios files for a few abit motherboards. While it is not all that difficult to do, one incorrect keystroke and your modded bios will not work AND most likely your motherboard is now unbootable ie junk.

The really fun part was when I flashed my motherboard with the modded file. It did work and the mod allowed custom selection of the HAL [hardware abstraction layer] during install of the operating system. I did hold my breath when rebooting after the custom flash. Once I knew it worked, then I could flash the bios of a few friends boards for them.
 

Kosner

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Just as an example, the motherboard I use in this system is an asrock gaming board. It allows you to choose what method of cpu voltage you want to use ie fixed vcore, auto, or offset.
I've been using manual, I did try the auto to start but it wanted to do per core overclocking and I wasn't fond of it's values. My biggest issue is trying to set the uncore up, since leaving it on auto might be why I couldn't get a stable 4.5 to begin with.

I guess I'll just have to be a lot more careful in the future then if the 1.7 typo is what caused this. Double check everything.
 

Kosner

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Well that was a bust. Installed the speaker as shown in the manual, and not a single beep. It doesn't even beep with both sticks of RAM removed.. the speaker doesn't look damaged in any way.
 
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