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Wifi extender maybe?

Discussion in 'Networking' started by ingeborgdot, Jun 6, 2016.

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  1. ingeborgdot

    ingeborgdot Thread Starter

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    I just moved a computer for a friend from one room to another as they replaced it with a new one. That said the old one in the other room has no internet source. They want to use it in the other room. What would be the best way to get internet to that computer? It will be 20' or so from the router. It is not line of site but it is pretty close overall. I have not had to look for anything like this before so I am kind of out of the loop. Thanks.
     
  2. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    Barring any materials which could attenuate or shield the RF signal between the old PC and the wireless router or any interference sources, 20' is not a great distance for any wireless device to operate under. IN addition, line of site doesn't matter in this situation as the antenna on all SOHO routers are omnidirectional. The only time line of site is a factor is if both ends are using directional antennas.
     
  3. ingeborgdot

    ingeborgdot Thread Starter

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    Okay, sounds good. Any recommendations on what to use to get a signal to the desktop computer. It has a nic but no wireless.
     
  4. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    You need to get a wireless NIC installed in the desktop. You can use either a PCIe drop in wireless NIC or a USB one.
     
  5. Triple6

    Triple6 Moderator

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    I assume you don't to run a cable to it?

    Do they have a wireless router with working wireless? I assume they do as pretty much everyone does these days.

    You have a lot of wireless cards and adapters to choose: http://www.newegg.com/Wireless-Adapters/SubCategory/ID-31?Tid=161579
    The easiest to install is a USB one where you just plug it into a USB port and install the drivers; don't have to open the computer or check what type of slot the computer has or if it's a full size card or a half height card.

    Since the distance is so short you can go with a small adapter like this for $8: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833704141
     
  6. ingeborgdot

    ingeborgdot Thread Starter

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    What they have right now is a Linksys Cisco E1500 router. I am thinking that maybe a wireless repeater would be even a better option for him because when he goes out to the truck bays he is really in no mans land for wireless signal and the wireless repeater would be somewhat line of sight for him and would for sure give him a much better signal.
     
  7. ingeborgdot

    ingeborgdot Thread Starter

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  8. Triple6

    Triple6 Moderator

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    You don't need an extender or repeater if it's only 20 feet, the existing router will easily do 20 feet, it'll easily do several times that range in a house. A repeater or extender is used to increase or extend the range of coverage in areas of weak wireless service. If you just want to add wireless to a computer you just need a simple wireless card.

    Is this a laptop and not a desktop? What truck bay are you referring too? Is this desktop now going to move around? Initially you said the computer would be 20 feet away. Why do keep referring to line of sight? Wireless is omnidirectional unless you specifically buy a directional antenna but there's no need for that in the setup you described in the first post.

    Unless you plan on plugging the extender into his computer, at which point you've pretty much turned it into an expensive wireless card, then you will also need wireless card for the computer. Some extenders do have LAN ports for connecting devices.

    You seem to be over-complicating a basic thing or you need to explain in better detail what you are trying to do.
     
  9. ingeborgdot

    ingeborgdot Thread Starter

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    I didn't explain myself again. When he goes out into the truck bay area which he does a lot he also could use better wifi which is almost non existent out there. The repeater would serve two fold by supplying wifi and connection to the desktop in which it is going to. The repeater has an ethernet port on it also that plugs into the computer.
     
  10. Triple6

    Triple6 Moderator

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    OK, that makes more sense.
     
  11. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    Unless the repeater has the ability to use 5 GHz as its backhaul and provide 2.4 GHz for client connectivity, I wouldn't waste my time with it.
     
  12. ingeborgdot

    ingeborgdot Thread Starter

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    Why is that?
     
  13. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    Because of how RF works. RF operates in a similar fashion as a half duplex network. This means only one device can talk on the RF network at any given time. For Ethernet, a protocol was created to prevent multiple devices from talking at the same time on a network with a hub. It's called CSMA/CD. The CD part is collision detection which is part of the spec on if the CSMA part didn't do its job in preventing two devices from sending a frame on the network, it will cause a retransmit and a pause on any network traffic being sent over the wire for a random time period. This is extremely disruptive and will quickly drag a network to its knees especially when a lot of hosts are connected on it.

    For RF there's a similar protocol to CSMA/CD which does pretty much the same thing. Getting back to why it's bad to use a repeater which operates on the same frequency as the client connections is due to this half duplex behavior. Let's start with a wireless client which sends a packet to something on the Internet. The packet gets sent over the air wave from itself to the repeater. At this point no other wireless device can talk on the network. The repeater receives the packet (actually frame) and then transmits the packet to the wireless router. Again no other wireless device can talk on the network until the repeater finishes sending the frame. The wireless router then receives the frame and drops it over the wire to the ISP and then Internet. Now reverse all these actions when the return reply comes back from whatever it is on the Internet.

    In contrast when a repeater has 5 GHz capability along with 2.4, the 5 GHz radio would be used exclusively for the backhaul to the main wireless point or wireless router. The limitations of having to wait for all the devices along the chain to finish communicating are removed. The only area of contention would be at the 2.4 GHz section of the repeater which would only be among connected wireless clients and not have the infrastructure to also demand the same air time. All of this is provided that the wireless router can use its 5 GHz radio as a wireless bridge/back haul. The other reason to use the 5 GHz space is due to less over all interference from other devices not a part of your network and the ability to have more channels to avoid sources of interference operating on the 5 GHz space. Remember 2.4 in the US only has 3 non overlapping channels to choose from. 5 GHz has 24 channels to choose from as a starting point. But the number of non overlapping channels will get reduced based on the channel width being used (40, 80, 160, etc.).

    Now a SOHO repeater may work well for this situation with no perceptible performance issues. But certainly don't expect it to scale as you add more wireless clients onto the network.
     
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