Win XP won't boot in dual boot with Win7

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Ramon
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I now have a new desktop with two SSD. One with W7 and the other with W10. I mostly use W10 to surf internet and just use W7 when I need to use some older programs I had on XP. I also have some extra HDD for backups and have an XP laptop just in case I need to do some work with older programs but never use it for surfing the internet.
 

Kapustin Yar

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The windows boot for 95, 98, XP are all compatible. I believe that starting with Vista the windows boot process was changed. The boot for W7 or W10 can coexist with XP only if the boot is modified to handle it. The boot for XP can not be made to work with W7 or W10. To make this work you have to overwrite its boot with one that is compatible with W7 or W10.

If you install XP first and then W7 or W10 then the boot menu will be set up for you by Windows.

If you install W7 or W10 first and then XP then I needed to test this to verify what would happen...

I already have both Windows 7 and 10 installed on my PC. I did a test install of XP on a free partition.

After I installed XP only it would boot. I booted with a Windows 10 setup DVD and ran boot problem repair. Now Windows 7 and 10 were both on the boot menu but not XP.

I ran EasyBCD and added XP to the boot menu. Now W10, W7, XP were all on the boot menu.

BTW, because of a hardware conflict Windows XP setup could not be completed.. If I would have taken the time to remove some of the optional components then the install might have completed. It was at least booting to XP. That is all that matters for this test.

If I selected XP from the windows boot menu it would try to continue the XP setup. During driver installation it would always crash. That is why I think there may be incompatible hardware in the PC.

Note the Gigabyte motherboard does support XP so that was not the problem.

Disk Management. There are three hard drives.
W10 was on NDC (C: ), XP was on NDG (G: ), and W7 was on ODC (K: )
View attachment 278971

EasyBCD showing entries for W10, W7, and XP
View attachment 278972

Final Windows Boot Menu
View attachment 278974
" The boot for XP can not be made to work with W7 or W10. To make this work you have to overwrite its boot with one that is compatible with W7 or W10. "

Well I've never seen a tri-boot before, congratulations. The thing is that I have had this installation for about five years. The computer is in my living room and I let the PC slide because it was old and my personal situation changed. Now I am interested in starting up the old rig. Games always work better on systems they were designed for rather than using compatibility mode in Windows, which seldom works.

So up about until a year ago I had a dual boot Win 7 winXP desktop that worked and now for no reason it does not.

Here is what I have tried that doesn't work
Ran SFC Scannow
chkdsk
restored the system files in Win XP:
restored all the files in XP
unplugged the PC and put the IDE and power cables back on the hard drives
pressed F8 and tried to get into safe-mode with networking
Tried to restart the PC and tried to boot into the last configuration that worked
switching the order of the boot, with both XP appearing on the bottom and top and also switching the order in the bios.

The one thing I haven't tried yet is using bcd creator. I am leaving till last because it is new software to me and know it will be difficult. Also the partition could be corrupted and I don't have enough knowledge to fix that, so if all else fails I"m taking it in and paying for it
 
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Switching the order in the BIOS is a waste of time when using a windows boot manage does the job much better. The computer I set up in the example I gave can not even be configured in the BIOS to select individual disks. For example I can select CD, HDD, etc but not individual devices. I can set the boot orderr to CD, HDD when I want to boot a CD or DVD. I change the order back to HDD, HDD when I want to boot from the hard drive. I could leave the order at CD, HDD but that slows down the boot because it has to wait for the boot from CD to time out before it will continue and boot from the hard drive.

I have been dual-booting for over twenty years now. The first computer I did this had an Intel 486DX2/66 CPU. In 1997 I had Windows 95 and Slackware 3.4 on it. The boot manager I used was LILO. Years later I switched to GRUB. The boot that Windows has now is much more flexible than it was back then. It can easily handle Win95, Win98, WinXP, Win7, Win 10, and even Linux. That makes it much better to let Windows handle the boot process rather than Linux.

BTW, I found it was a mistake to try to install the original Windows XP without any service packs. I had reserved a small part of a 1TB hard drive for it. Windows XP setup proceeded to trash the drives partition table. Luckily I had a recent backup for it. I then found out that original Windows XP had a 137GB drive limit. SP1 fixed that.

In any event don't give up. It is a enjoyable to learn how to do this.

In 2004 I set up Linux Fedora Core 2 (FC2) to dual boot with Windows XP. FC2 had a bug that messed up the drive's partitions. Fedora eventually admitted to the problem but said it would not fix it until Fedora Core 3. It took me a few weeks but I finally figured out how to fix the disk's partition so that both WinXP and FC2 could be booted.
 
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Kapustin Yar

Thread Starter
Joined
Dec 11, 2008
Messages
923
Switching the order in the BIOS is a waste of time when using a windows boot manage does the job much better. The computer I set up in the example I gave can not even be configured in the BIOS to select individual disks. For example I can select CD, HDD, etc but not individual devices. I can set the boot orderr to CD, HDD when I want to boot a CD or DVD. I change the order back to HDD, HDD when I want to boot from the hard drive. I could leave the order at CD, HDD but that slows down the boot because it has to wait for the boot from CD to time out before it will continue and boot from the hard drive.

I have been dual-booting for over twenty years now. The first computer I did this had an Intel 486DX2/66 CPU. In 1997 I had Windows 95 and Slackware 3.4 on it. The boot manager I used was LILO. Years later I switched to GRUB. The boot that Windows has now is much more flexible than it was back then. It can easily handle Win95, Win98, WinXP, Win7, Win 10, and even Linux. That makes it much better to let Windows handle the boot process rather than Linux.

BTW, I found it was a mistake to try to install the original Windows XP without any service packs. I had reserved a small part of a 1TB hard drive for it. Windows XP setup proceeded to trash the drives partition table. Luckily I had a recent backup for it. I then found out that original Windows XP had a 137GB drive limit. SP1 fixed that.

In any event don't give up. It is a enjoyable to learn how to do this.

In 2004 I set up Linux Fedora Core 2 (FC2) to dual boot with Windows XP. FC2 had a bug that messed up the drive's partitions. Fedora eventually admitted to the problem but said it would not fix it until Fedora Core 3. It took me a few weeks but I finally figured out how to fix the disk's partition so that both WinXP and FC2 could be booted.
Well I downloaded Easy BCD creater and put it on a blank DVD. Then I rebooted and played the DVD then I clicked Repair this disk and it ran about two minutes. Then I shut down the PC and waited about 10 seconds and then I tried to boot into XP. No joy. What should I do now, Thanks, K
 
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Well I downloaded Easy BCD creater and put it on a blank DVD. Then I rebooted and played the DVD then I clicked Repair this disk and it ran about two minutes. Then I shut down the PC and waited about 10 seconds and then I tried to boot into XP. No joy. What should I do now, Thanks, K
I have never used that version. The one I use is under:
---------------------------------
Non-commercial Free
Limited, community support
No early access to new features
Only for personal, non-commercial use
REGISTER
---------------------------------
This version you install under Windows 7 or 10.
Run EasyBCD
The menu should shows Windows 7 as the only entry
To add Windows XP select "Add New Entry"
Select Type: Windows NT/2k/XP/2k3
It should automatically find XP
If not manually select drive letter for XP
If successful a new Windows XP entry should be added to boot menu
 

Kapustin Yar

Thread Starter
Joined
Dec 11, 2008
Messages
923
I have never used that version. The one I use is under:
---------------------------------
Non-commercial Free
Limited, community support
No early access to new features
Only for personal, non-commercial use
REGISTER
---------------------------------
This version you install under Windows 7 or 10.
Run EasyBCD
The menu should shows Windows 7 as the only entry
To add Windows XP select "Add New Entry"
Select Type: Windows NT/2k/XP/2k3
It should automatically find XP
If not manually select drive letter for XP
If successful a new Windows XP entry should be added to boot menu
Your quote and my reply after the dash:
The menu should shows Windows 7 as the only entry - It does not. Both win7 and XP show up. What should I do now?
 
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Messages
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Your quote and my reply after the dash:
The menu should shows Windows 7 as the only entry - It does not. Both win7 and XP show up. What should I do now?
Maybe your Windows XP install is corrupted. Have you tried reinstalling Windows XP?
If you do that only Windows XP will boot
That is OK because you can boot from the Windows 7 DVD to repair the boot for it.
After that you can boot to Windows 7 and use EasyBCD to add Windows XP again.
 
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As shown in post # 1.
I don't understand your comment. The OP yesturday posted that he still wants to dual-boot Windows XP with Windows 7. If Windows XP is corrupt beyond repair then the easiest way to fix this is to reinstall it. I said how to do this. If you have a better solution now is the time to speak up.
 

Kapustin Yar

Thread Starter
Joined
Dec 11, 2008
Messages
923
Maybe your Windows XP install is corrupted. Have you tried reinstalling Windows XP?
If you do that only Windows XP will boot
That is OK because you can boot from the Windows 7 DVD to repair the boot for it.
After that you can boot to Windows 7 and use EasyBCD to add Windows XP again.
No, I just figured out that I have the wrong IDE cable attached to the D drive. The one that I had attached said E not D and there was a games drive attached that I had no idea where to attach. I reatttached the D drive to the correct IDE but not D won't show up. In addition my games drive won't show up and one of my DVD drives won't show up.

The layout is
C - Main drive, Win7
D - secondary drive WinXP
E - DVD drive
F - DVD drive
G- Movies drive
H- Games drive.
 
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Messages
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No, I just figured out that I have the wrong IDE cable attached to the D drive. The one that I had attached said E not D and there was a games drive attached that I had no idea where to attach. I reatttached the D drive to the correct IDE but not D won't show up. In addition my games drive won't show up and one of my DVD drives won't show up.

The layout is
C - Main drive, Win7
D - secondary drive WinXP
E - DVD drive
F - DVD drive
G- Movies drive
H- Games drive.
BTW, how many physical drives do you have? Most computers that used IDE had 2 IDE connectors which allowed up to 4 drives (hard or optical). To get more you had to add a plug-in PCI card. Do you have one of these cards? Most of the cards like this I have seen only support hard drives and do not work with CD or DVD drives. Or do you have additional drives connected with USB enclosures?

For example I have a few old cards like this

Do you have the IDE cables connected correctly?

There are two types of IDE cable:
1. Regular
2. Cable Select

Connecting drives to Regular cables:
Motherboard -- none -- Master drive
Motherboard -- Slave drive -- Master drive
where,
For Master drive jumper set to Master
For Slave drive jumper set to Slave

Connecting drives to Cable Select cables:
Motherboard -- none -- Master drive
Motherboard -- Slave drive -- Master drive
where,
For Master drive jumper set to Cable Select (CS)
For Slave drive jumper set to Cable Select (CS)

To know how you configure the jumpers on a particular you have to consult the drive's documentation because there is not one standard.
 

Kapustin Yar

Thread Starter
Joined
Dec 11, 2008
Messages
923
BTW, how many physical drives do you have? Most computers that used IDE had 2 IDE connectors which allowed up to 4 drives (hard or optical). To get more you had to add a plug-in PCI card. Do you have one of these cards? Most of the cards like this I have seen only support hard drives and do not work with CD or DVD drives. Or do you have additional drives connected with USB enclosures?

For example I have a few old cards like this

Do you have the IDE cables connected correctly?

There are two types of IDE cable:
1. Regular
2. Cable Select

Connecting drives to Regular cables:
Motherboard -- none -- Master drive
Motherboard -- Slave drive -- Master drive
where,
For Master drive jumper set to Master
For Slave drive jumper set to Slave

Connecting drives to Cable Select cables:
Motherboard -- none -- Master drive
Motherboard -- Slave drive -- Master drive
where,
For Master drive jumper set to Cable Select (CS)
For Slave drive jumper set to Cable Select (CS)

To know how you configure the jumpers on a particular you have to consult the drive's documentation because there is not one standard.
Hey Mr Ed

I have 6 drives. An Win7 Drive, and XP Drive a Games drive, a Backup drive a Movie drive and two DVD drives. I also have xtra room with an extra card for another drive if I want it.

I gave up and took it down to the shop to have it fixed. I got a call back and the tech told me that he didn't have to do that much to fix it. He said I must have jostled something when I took it down because he said he didn't have a problem booting into XP. He said said he cleared some dust rodents and rewired some stuff for me to keep track of it but I got out of there for less than 20 bucks. Quite nice.

I want to thank you for all you help. See you on the boards, K.:)
 
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Messages
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Hey Mr Ed

I have 6 drives. An Win7 Drive, and XP Drive a Games drive, a Backup drive a Movie drive and two DVD drives. I also have xtra room with an extra card for another drive if I want it.

I gave up and took it down to the shop to have it fixed. I got a call back and the tech told me that he didn't have to do that much to fix it. He said I must have jostled something when I took it down because he said he didn't have a problem booting into XP. He said said he cleared some dust rodents and rewired some stuff for me to keep track of it but I got out of there for less than 20 bucks. Quite nice.

I want to thank you for all you help. See you on the boards, K.:)
I am glad you got it sorted out. You got it fixed for a very reasonable amount because a lot of places would have charged a lot more. You were vague in what had to be fixed. If you knew what exactly the problem was maybe you could have learned how to fix a similar problem yourself in the future.
 

Kapustin Yar

Thread Starter
Joined
Dec 11, 2008
Messages
923
I am glad you got it sorted out. You got it fixed for a very reasonable amount because a lot of places would have charged a lot more. You were vague in what had to be fixed. If you knew what exactly the problem was maybe you could have learned how to fix a similar problem yourself in the future.
Well the tech was vague too. He didn't tell me what went wrong. He said sometimes you just have to play with it long enough. My problem though is when I play with it, I often screw it up even more.

You are right, but the tech did tell me something. He said, first the boot manager was located on C drive. Nothing was located on D drive. So trying to restore hal.dll on D was useless. Second he said that Hal.dll was an error. It said that nothing was wrong with Hal.dll.
 

Kapustin Yar

Thread Starter
Joined
Dec 11, 2008
Messages
923
Well the tech was vague too. He didn't tell me what went wrong. He said sometimes you just have to play with it long enough. My problem though is when I play with it, I often screw it up even more.

You are right, but the tech did tell me something. He said, first the boot manager was located on C drive. Nothing was located on D drive. So trying to restore hal.dll on D was useless. Second he said that Hal.dll was an error. It said that nothing was wrong with Hal.dll.
He also said he removed all the other drives first and replaced them one by one which was kind of strange because he said when I transported and jostled them they worked. You are right. It was kind of strange.
 
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