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Windows 10 not booting

Discussion in 'Windows 10' started by Xondor, Apr 16, 2018.

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  1. Xondor

    Xondor Thread Starter

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    Hey guys.

    I got a big problem, I hope anyone could help me out here.

    First of all I downloaded+installed 'BullGuard' to try it out and scan my computer. The complete scan and removal(virus) took me about 1:30h. After it was done the program preffered a reboot, so I decided to go for it.
    Now my operating system won't boot up. I did not touch anything for 2-3h and nothing changed so I decided to shut down the comp.
    There is no text at all only blackscreen with a blank space blinking.
    I am able to get into the BIOS if I restart but I actually have no Idea what to do.

    I don't know where to post this Thread so if it's on the wrong category feel free to move it.

    I hope you guys can help me out.
     
  2. Paul23

    Paul23 Temporarily Banned

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    Do you have a copy of Windows 10 on a usb or dvd?
     
  3. Xondor

    Xondor Thread Starter

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    No sadly I do not, but I have a Laptop and I could get a copy of Windows 10 on a USB, I just don't know how I do it
     
  4. Paul23

    Paul23 Temporarily Banned

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  5. Paul23

    Paul23 Temporarily Banned

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    Don't immediately install Windows 10. We will try to repair your computer, first, within the recovery environment you can now access with your new usb Windows copy.
     
  6. pkokkinis

    pkokkinis

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    Um, without having to reinstall your operating system, maybe try booting into startup menu and selecting last Known Good Configuration. To get into the startup menu, start with your computer completely powered off. Find the F8 button on your keyboard and if you write with your right hand, keep your right pointer finger over the F8 key in the ready position. with any finger of your left hand, power up the computer and start whaling on the F8 key with your right pointer. Keep going until you see a black screen with white lettering. Select Last Known Good Configuration. Say a prayer as it tries booting up. Otherwise, your computer is badly damaged by the malware you willingly downloaded, installed, and ran. I'd personally buy a hard drive, install winodows, then transfer wahtever data was needed off the infected drive onto the new drive using a usb-sata adapter. Good. Luck.
     
  7. jenae

    jenae

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    Hi, try doing a regback, it is similar to "last known good" which is not natively now available in win 10, so post #6 won't work.

    If you have made a recovery disk (always do this as prompted during install and after) change boot order in BIOS to boot from it. If not create a OS media install disk, (you will need to do this on another computer, either dvd or usb) get from:-


    https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10.


    Booting from this you select “Repair your computer” option (will also have to change boot order in BIOS). This opens the RE (same for the recovery disk) here you select Troubleshoot, then Advanced, from the options select Command prompt.


    There is another way to access the RE this involves booting, and then when windows attempts to load pressing and holding down the shutdown button to force a shutdown. Doing this, two or more times alerts windows to a problem, and it will boot to the RE. Unfortunately here begins a game of Russian roulette, if the system runs a startup repair (diagnosing system) it is likely to leave the regback with 0 bytes, if it attempts to repair registry (happens for some not others) so this is a last resort.


    Once into the RE selecting command prompt, we need to establish what drive the RE has assigned the OS, (in the RE the OS is often given another drive letter, we need to know this for our cmd’s to work) you will see a X:\sources prompt, default is X:\Windows\System32> at this we type :-


    Bcdedit | find “osdevice” (type exactly as you see here, spaces and syntax important, the | is called a pipe and can be found above the \ key)


    This cmd will return:- osdevice…..partition X (where X is a drive letter, we use this letter in the following cmd’s, often in windows ten this is the D drive, you use what the cmd returns, our example use’s D)


    At the X:\Windows\System32> prompt type:-


    D: (press enter) the prompt now looks like:-

    D:\>

    At this type:-

    cd d:\windows\system32\config\regback (press enter), the prompt changes to this directory.

    Next type:- Dir (press enter)

    The contents of the regback folder will appear. Make sure there is data in the folder (not 0 bytes) and check the creation date, if it was before your problem, proceed, if not exit out, it won't work.



    If you proceed then next type:-

    copy *.* d:\windows\system32\config (press enter)

    Type:- ALL to the override prompt, it will say files copied, 5 hives will be copied. Exit out and restart computer.

    NOTE:- before anyone mentions doing a backup.. we are restoring a backup, I see no reason for doing a backup of a backup, never had a problem with this on thousands of machines.

    This is a copy of the cmd prompt with cmd's as an example for you:-
    Microsoft Windows [Version 10.0.16299.15]

    X:\windows\system32>D:

    D:\> cd D:\windows\system32\config\regback

    D:\Windows\System32\config\RegBack>Dir

    Volume in drive D has no label.
    Volume Serial Number is 5B06-A0F0
    Directory of D:\Windows\System32\config\RegBack

    28/01/2018 21:35 <DIR> .
    28/01/2018 21:35 <DIR> ..
    28/01/2018 21:35 704,512 DEFAULT
    28/01/2018 21:35 90,112 SAM
    28/01/2018 21:35 32,768 SECURITY
    28/01/2018 21:35 88,342,528 SOFTWARE
    28/01/2018 21:35 19,267,584 SYSTEM
    5 File(s) 108,437,504 bytes
    2 Dir(s) 412,430,352,384 bytes free

    D:\Windows\System32\config\RegBack>copy *.* D:\windows\system32\config


    NOTE:- It is important that you use the exact syntax seen here, spaces are important.
     
  8. Xondor

    Xondor Thread Starter

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    Hey Guys, first of all thanks for your replies.

    jenae I did what you told me, everything worked with your commands.
    It even copied the 5 hives, I did exit and restart the comp and it did not boot up.

    Edit: I did notice after Bcdedit | find "osdevice" it was still showing X:\sources and not X:\Windows\System32 I don't know if there is any difference but I am able to switch to my osdevice (in my case C:\>)

    I don't know what to do know, do you have any other solutions ?
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2018
  9. MrBillPro

    MrBillPro

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2003
    Messages:
    549
    I know hindsight is always 20/20 but Acronis True Image is your friend, I've been using it since around 2003, great piece of mind.
     
    Paul23 likes this.
  10. jenae

    jenae

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    Hi, the purpose of running the bcdedit cmd is to determine what drive letter the OS has been assigned in the RE. Even though your OS is on C: drive, in the RE (which is a virtual diagnostic drive) the OS is usually not assigned to C: drive, we have to use the OS assigned drive letter for the cmd's to work properly. Usually it will be D: drive.
    From post #7:-
    "This cmd will return:- osdevice…..partition X (where X is a drive letter, we use this letter in the following cmd’s, often in windows ten this is the D drive, you use what the cmd returns, our example use’s D)"
     
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