Windows 2003 Server

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tzar

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Mar 11, 2004
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Hi,
I need help from all those who have used, managed, or been connected to Windows 2003 Server before.

I am currently managing Win NT Server 4.0 at my office. Am thinking of upgrading my server OS to 2003 Server. The only hindrance is the cost. I understand the server OS itself is not that steep, but the client-license is the costly one.

Now, this is not a politically correct question:
What is the license for users/clients for 2003 Server like? Is it just a piece of paper license? Or does it have some authentication number to authorize each user when they connect to the server?
Basically, my politically incorrect question is whether I can buy the OS itself, install it on my server and let my user/clients connect to it without having to buy the license for each of them?

Can anyone who have had prior experience with this pls help me?
Thanks in advance... if you were living in my neighborhood I'd buy you a meal anytime...
 
Joined
Nov 14, 2003
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As it stands, you have to have a license for each client OR device that connects to the server.

In response to your question, yes. The initial CAL license that comes with Windows 2003 server is a piece of paper that outlines the number of CALs you own. (IIRC both Standard, Enterprise, and Small Business Server come with 5 CALs). Depending on how you license your Windows 2003 server, you can purchase CALS either individually or in a 5 pack. If you add CALs there is, indeed, a license code that you plug into the license manager.

One thing you might want to look at is how many simultaneous connections do you have at once? I've helped a lot of clients cut down the number of CALs they need by really examining staffing levels and using either the Per Seat or Per Device licensing.
 

tzar

Thread Starter
Joined
Mar 11, 2004
Messages
47
Thanks for your valuable reply,

So what you mean is that I can actually buy a Win2003 Server pack with 5-user CAL, but have 20 or more users running a mixture of Win98, Win ME, Win2000 machines as clients, all at the same time?

Sorry if I sound really daft, but I need to be really sure on this. The Microsoft site on this issue is so full of grey areas.
 
Joined
Nov 14, 2003
Messages
112
Let's look at that again. If you have 15 users and 5 machines, you can get away with 5 licenses. This is great in a business that has people working in shifts (secretarial staff, help desk, etc.) Here the numbers go like this (keep in mind that Windows 2003 Server includes includes 5 CALs): 5 machines in Per Device licensing = $0.00 extra vs. 10 extra CALs (for 15 users total) in Per User licensing. That's an extra $1000 bucks!

On the other hand if you have 15 users, each with a PC and a PocketPC device (that access the server) you're gonna want to use Per User licensing. (15 users x 2 devices = 30 CALs under Per Device licensing vs. 15 users x multiple devices = 15 CALs under Per User licensing... a $1500 savings).

It really can pay off to look at the number of people you have hammering the server at any one time. Part time secretaries, night shift employees, weekend shift, etc. it all adds up. Like income taxes, the hook is to be completely legal but not pay the MS juggernaut a penny more than you have to.

Here is a link that might provide some additional insight
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/howtobuy/licensing/caloverview.mspx


From the Windows 2003 Server Site:
--------------------------------------------------------
*Device-based vs. User-based Windows CALs*

With the release of Windows Server 2003, there are now two types of Windows CALs to choose from—device-based or user-based, known as Windows Device CALs or Windows User CALs. This means you can choose to acquire a Windows CAL for every device (used by any user) accessing your servers, or you can choose to acquire a Windows CAL for every named user accessing your servers (from any device).

The option to choose between the two types of Windows CALs offers you the flexibility to use the licensing that best suits the needs of your organization. For example:

• Windows Device CALs might make most economic and administrative sense for an organization with multiple users for one device, such as shift workers.

• Whereas, Windows User CALs might make most sense for an organization with many roaming employees that need access to the corporate network from unknown devices and/or employees who access the network via multiple devices.
 
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