Windows Server 2003 - Problems with Shares

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Garrett
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Hey everybody :D

I'm having some trouble with creating shares and permissions withing Windows Server 2003. I want to have a share on the server that only one user can map a drive to.

I would tell what steps I have taken, but I have done so many things, it might be best to just start from scratch, since nothing is in the folder yet anyway. Can someone give me a quick guide to creating a share, and making it where only one user can access it?

I'm creating it on the C: on the server.

Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated. :D Thanks.
 
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My suggestion would be NOT to share anything on C since that is your system volume.
1.) Have you set up a user account in Active Directory?

What exactly is the problem you are having mapping a drive letter?
 

smooth

Garrett
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Hey, thanks for the reply. :D

Well, the problem I'm having is weird. I set up the share, and couldn't map to it from the computer that I wanted to. I went back, and gave my user permission (my computer, not the user I am mapping for) to it, and could get to it using my username (on my computer).

The problem is that the network wasn't set up very well before I got here. There is no naming convention being used presently. The usernames on the PC's are all random names that they just came up with. I'm working on changing all of that, but am having trouble with finding all the necessary disks to set up the new users (Microsoft Office being the main one). Since when I create a new user on the computer, and then try to run Microsoft Word, or any other Office program, it asks for the disks.

It seems like I'm just not giving permission to the right user, since I can get to it if I set permission up for me.

1.) Have you set up a user account in Active Directory?
I'm not exactly sure what you mean here. The user itself has been on the server for a long time, since they have access to the files on the server, internet, printers, etc.
 
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You need to set up user accounts on the SERVER, not the workstation. If this is indeed a Windows 2003 server there is a utility in the administrative tools called Active Directory Users & Computers, that is where you add or remove users to be authenticated on the network. I have a feeling this was set up as a standalone server without AD or DNS set up.
 

smooth

Garrett
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I set up the users on the server, and then go to the workstations and create new users. The user that I am having problems with has been a user since before I got here.

I'm not exactly sure what is going on, since I haven't done too much with some of the computers, as I have with others.

Don't I need to set up new users on the workstation, after I have set up a user on the server, so that the user from the workstation can get all the permissions that the user on the workstation can get?

What are the benefits of Active Directory? I've heard that once you enable this, it can not be disabled. So if I were to do that, I would want to make sure that I absolutely wanted it?
 
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Are you absolutely sure this is a Windows 2003 Server OS and not a workstation running Windows 200 Pro set up as a file server? If you had a Win2K3 server with AD you only need to add users, printers and computers from the server. AD is a centralized storage and management point for settings, policies and you can also deploy applications and updates from the interface. The main benefit is cetralized administration and you won't have to run around to every workstation to add accounts, the server would do it all.
 

smooth

Garrett
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Yes, I'm certain it's Windows Server 2003.

Undoubtedly Active Directory is not active on it. I've never messed with that part. The way I've always been told to add users is to go and add a user to the server, and then go around and add the user to the workstation that user is on.

So is Active Directory where the server has all of the usernames stored, and when I sit at any computer I can just enter whatever username and password that I want, and log onto the server like that, without having to set up every user seperately? If this is the case, it sounds like it is much better than what we have right now.
 
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Once again, once you have AD set up you only need to add users at the server. You will however need to have each computer join the domain. I would suggest that instead of using a fully qualified domain name when you set up AD you use something like "domainname.local"
instead of a .com or .org , this way DNS won't have a problem resolving your real domain name with the local DNS. DNS also has to be set up to be able to install AD.
 
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