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WinXP, router, virus software conflict

Discussion in 'Networking' started by Cosmic, Apr 25, 2004.

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  1. Cosmic

    Cosmic Thread Starter

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    I got a new PC running WinXP-Pro. Supposed to be set up on a network with a wireless BEFW11S4 Linksys router. Also to share that network was my old PC running Win98SE using a Linksys WUSB11 plug in Wireless network adapter.

    Basically nothing works right. The XP computer can access the web but it really crawls. Can take a couple of minutes to open a site page. Back button will not work. Totally screwed up. Couldn't register XP-Pro on line, wound up doing it via telephone.

    The old PC can not even access the network. Horribly unstable, screen blinks, will not even recognize the router software is installed. Will attempt to work that out once I fix the new PC.

    Tried to get a hold of the guy that built the system. No answer. Called my ISP and he said the cable modem system I have is set up to auto install networks and it was all very easy, call Linksys and have them walk me thru troubleshooting it.

    Called LinkSys, they claim the problem with the new PC running XP-Pro is a conflict between either a virus installed program or a firewall. Far as I know the router has no firewall. I particularly asked the vendor and he said it would just have the XP-Pro standard stuff. We monkeyed around changing this and that, nothing worked.

    What I need to do is first solve the problem of getting my new PC on line using the network. What to do first and how to begin to figure out what is the problem? It will access the web but only a few sites, very, very slow can't do much inside a site. So I can't use it to directly access this site.

    I am reduced to hooking up my old PC, hard wired back to the cable modem as before to get here to start to ask what to do? So to play with the new PC will have to swap out to attempt any fixes. Going to be a real pain.

    You have to be pretty basic. I don't know much about the XP-Pro operating system or networks. What I turn off, do or fix to attempt to figure out what is causing the problem. My ability to add new stuff to the new PC is going to be pretty limited. i.e. HiJack, etc, none of the normal programs used here are probably installed. Might be able to download them to this old PC on a ZIP drive and move them over.

    You guys are my best hope of having a foggy idea of what is happening. Know this might be quite common but it all new to me. Have zero network experience and no real operating experience on XP-Pro. My life before has been on Win98SE with just one PC hardwired in a standard cable always on setup.

    Supposely this was all setup in the vendor shop and running. I sort of saw it but noted it did seem quirky and a bit slow there too. They didn't let me play with it much. After the demo, they changed the settings manually to the numbers I read off my old system at home. Worked a lot better in the demo than it does now. The old Win98 PC could read the network and Web. Puzzled as to the problem. My ISP guy thought it was just a matter of auto configuring everything as they could have put the wrong settings. Think I will get better help here than anywhere else.

    TIA
     
  2. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    You are posting a lot of stuff to digest at once.

    First off, for a cable modem, you should normally need NONE of the vendor or ISP software, everything you need is in every version of Windows.

    I'd suggest you reset the router back to factory defaults, since that should allow you to connect, and then try one computer at a time. Since XP is the wired one, that's the obvious place to start.

    In the Network Connections in the Control Panel, right click on Local Area Connection and select Properties. In the window, select the TCP/IP protocol, and properties. Make sure that both Obtain an IP address automatically and Obtain a DNS address automatically are checked.

    Close the windows by clicking on OK until you're out, and reboot and see if you have better luck with the Internet connection.
     
  3. Cosmic

    Cosmic Thread Starter

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    Thanks,

    Think that was what the ISP guy was telling me too. The shop was using a DSL setup and they fiddled with all sorts of stuff manually. It seemed to work there but not here. So by logic does that rule out a conflict?

    If it works in DSL setup should also work here if I follow your directions?

    Exactly how do I reset the router back to the factory defaults? Is that with the disk provided with the hardware? I really don't understand much about this. One time thru and will probably start to catch on.

    Do you have to reset the modem by turning off power too? The LinkSys guy did that. Powered both down and brought the cable back first with a 30 delay, then the router. Thought I would ask these question first. Swapping the computers around to get back on line is a real pain if it don't work first time.

    Think I got the general drift though.

    Thanks
     
  4. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    The DSL setup changes the WAN configuration of the router, so if it were left that way, you would not be able to connect with 99% of the cable company configurations. Let's review the steps:

    Restore the router to factory defaults, usually by holding the reset for 15 seconds or so, your setup doc should tell you the exact procedure.

    Power everything off.

    Turn on the cable modem, let it get synchronized.

    Turn on the router, wait about 1 minute.

    Turn on the computer, and if the planets are all aligned, you should be connected. :)

    Whenever you connect the cable modem to a new device, you MUST power cycle it to reset it, or it won't connect.
     
  5. Cosmic

    Cosmic Thread Starter

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    OK, great now have the new PC on line running on the network.

    Working on getting the old PC running Win98SE on the network.

    This has a wireless-B Network adapter LinkSys WUSB11 plugged into the USB port. How do I get this one on line? Did the same thing as the Win-XP one but the control panel looks different. Didn't see any auto detect features.

    When I click on the installed LinkSys software that is running on my tool bar, I get a window that says.

    NO ASSOCIATION WITH ACCESS POINT and a little logo that says WUSB11 IS INACTIVE.

    How do I get started here?

    The LinkSys people had me up grade the firmware but the PC doesn't even want to acknowledge the software is present when I go into a little diagnostics program that was part of that up grade and it says, can't proceed. Think I was told, don't even need the LinkSys stuff.

    Got to be an easy way to do this. :eek:

    Thanks, you guys are a life saver. (y)
     
  6. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    Actually, you do need the Linksys drivers for the USB WAP, it's not like wired Ethernet. I'd get the Linksys software talking to the WAP first, since if you can't do that, it's somewhat pointless to proceed farther. I think if you get the drivers loaded, you'll be able to make a lot more progress. :)
     
  7. Cosmic

    Cosmic Thread Starter

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    Thanks for that.

    I am sort of debating if the entire effort is worth it. The PC is coming on 6 years old and really showing its age. Limping pretty bad. Got stuff patched up all over the place.

    I am getting a new back up PC with very down scaled capabilities to my new PC. Same general core parts / motherboard, etc. Just not all the drives and whistles and bells. Will put it on the wireless link.

    Was debating on making the Drive C of the new machine swappable and moving my old machines hard drive over that way. Have the ability to run two OS by swapping out the drives.

    Do you think my problems are being caused by the old hardware or is there something about Win98SE that will still fight being put on the wireless link. Something about the USB port maybe. The other OS will be Win XP-Pro. Only want to do this because I have a lot of data / hard drives that could be useful that operated on various machines under Win98SE.

    Would trying to get a more recent copy of Win98SE be a reasonable approach. Or is it pretty much a lost cause? Some machines running Win98SE must be operating on LinkSys wireless links. Could copy the stuff to CD-ROMs or whatever if it came to it for moving to the new OS. Would be nice to run two OS's on the wireless link.

    Or does playing around more trying to get the old PC to finally go on the wireless make sense. I didn't try all the options in the menu's.

    Trying to better understand the best course of action.

    If I got another cable and temporarly hooked the old machine up as a hard wired network machine should that work and not require the LinkSys software? Should be able to get anything of value if it would work. Could live with scrapping the old system at some point.

    Am finding Win XP-Pro to be far better than I was led to believe. All a matter of customizing, putting all my icons on the desktop and making it look as much like the Win98SE as possible. Getting to like it pretty good.
     
  8. clarke123

    clarke123

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    I've set up a Windows 98se computer on a wireless network 4 or 5 times. First, it HAS to be 98SE, not first edition, for the Linksys hardware I use. Secondly, a couple of times it automatically configured itself in terms of making the connection, but generally, I had to go into the TCP/IP settings of the 98se machine and manually enter the IP, DNS, and Gateway info. If you don't know where to find these settings, call the ISP for their DNS info. The Linksys default gateway is 192.168.1.1. Also, it wasn't enough to disable Zone Alarm and/or McAfee...I had to REMOVE the software completely before a connection could be made. Lastly, did you enter a host and domain name on the router interface? One would think it would not matter but I fought a 98se machine for 4 hours before entering that info and it kicked right in.

    Clarke
     
  9. Cosmic

    Cosmic Thread Starter

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    Clarke, thanks for that information. Will come in real handy if I decide to fight that battle. Guess I will get another network cable and see if I can hard wire it local and do what I want first.

    Looks like I am done with Win98SE after this fight. All good things must end. :)
     
  10. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    Hard wiring the W98 machine should be very easy, basically the same setup as XP.
     
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