Wireless Laptop networked with wire network?

Status
This thread has been Locked and is not open to further replies. Please start a New Thread if you're having a similar issue. View our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

John Denow

Thread Starter
Joined
Nov 20, 1999
Messages
189
Greetings...

It's been quite a while since I have needed your assistance. I have spent the last 1/2 hour browsing entries in this forum, but have not found the answer to my question.

I recently purchased an HP laptop for my son for college. I also chose to buy a Netgear wireless router to allow him to access the internet "wirelessly" rather than plugging in with a cat5 patch cord.

My current set-up is as follows:

Cable (DSL) signal is connected to a Linksys cable modem.

Linksys Cable modem feeds DSL signal to a 4 port Linksys Router.

3 desktop PC's are connected (via Cat5) to 3 of the ports and networked to file share and print to a centrally located printer.

The Netgear wireless router is plugged into the 4th port and that, in turn, feeds the internet signal wirelessly to the laptop (works great!!).

What I would like to do is allow his laptop to fileshare with the other 3 "hard-wired" PC's and print to the current "hard-wired" printer.

Is this possible and if so, HOW ?? I find "wizards" in the control panel to establish a "home office" network (already in place with the other 3 PC's) and a "wireless" network, but I think this set-up would be a hibrid, so to speak.

Thanks for any assistance you can provide
 
Joined
Nov 27, 2002
Messages
618
Greetings John :)

This should be exactly the same to set up as a normal wired PC. Are you using DHCP or static IPs for your network? What I would do is run the IPCONFIG command on each PC (click start > run > type 'command' then type IPCONFIG in the DOS window) to find out the IP of each machine. Then share the folder or printer on one particular machine, then map to the share from the other PC via the IP. I hope this makes sense, if it doesn't just let me know.
 

John Denow

Thread Starter
Joined
Nov 20, 1999
Messages
189
Just to clarify that nothing is plugged into the Wireless router. I am using just the wireless signal coming from it after plugging it into the Linksys router that everything else is networked thru.

This being said, do I choose "set up wireless network" or "set up home/small office network"? I assume I would do this all from the laptop using the wireless signal.

Thanks for the clarification
 

TerryNet

Moderator
Joined
Mar 23, 2005
Messages
80,272
First Name
Terry
Make sure that you can ping the other computers from the laptop, and the laptop from the other computers. Assuming the pings show you have connectivity then, since you've already set up the other computers, just run the "set up home/small ..." wizard on the laptop.
 

JohnWill

Retired Moderator
Joined
Oct 19, 2002
Messages
106,418
This configuration should solve the problem.


Connecting two SOHO broadband routers together.

Configure the IP address of the secondary router to be in the same subnet as the primary router, but out of the range of the DHCP server in the primary router. For instance DHCP server addresses 192.168.0.2 through 192.168.0.100, I'd assign the secondary router 192.168.0.254 as it's IP address.

Disable the DHCP server in the secondary router.

Setup the wireless section just the way you would if it was the primary router.

Connect from the primary router's LAN port to one of the LAN ports on the secondary router. If there is no uplink port and neither of the routers have auto-sensing ports, use a cross-over cable. Leave the WAN port unconnected!
 

TerryNet

Moderator
Joined
Mar 23, 2005
Messages
80,272
First Name
Terry
JohnWill, in your example would clients of the secondary (wireless) router be assigned static IPs 192.168.0.101 through 192.168.0.253?

Won't John Denow's configuration (LAN port from 1st router plugged into WAN port of secondary) work provided care is taken that the secondary (wireless) clients get DHCP IP addresses different from those assigned by the 1st router?
 

JohnWill

Retired Moderator
Joined
Oct 19, 2002
Messages
106,418
The problem with using the WAN port port is it blocks the file sharing, which I thought was the point of the exercise. :) In my example, the secondary router is used as a WAP with no DHCP capability, and the IP addresses are assigned from the primary router. FWIW, this works fine, I've connected them that way in a number of locations, including here. No need to have two DHCP servers running, that will only further complicate things.

If the only point was to share Internet all around, using the WAN port of the secondary router would work fine, and it actually blocks the first LAN segment from access to anything on the secondary router. This is a desirable configuration in some cases, and I've also used this attribute several times.
 

John Denow

Thread Starter
Joined
Nov 20, 1999
Messages
189
Once again to clarify..

The NetGear Wireless Firewall Router Model WGT624 has a patch cord that run from the "internet" port to the last open port on the Linksys firewall router/switch.

I hooked it up this way, so if my son chooses to relocate the wireless router to a different location, he can simply unplug it and go.

I'm sure this whole procedure would be very straight forward if I simply replaced the Linksys with the Netgear and plugged everything into the Netgear, but once again, I want to have the flexability of relocating the wireless router if needed (school/apartment,...).

That being said, I'm a bit lost with the last few replies. Would it make anything any easier if I just wanted to be able to print to the current network printer and not worry about file sharing with the other computers??
(ie laptop>>netgear router>>Linksys router>>printer )

Thanks again
 

JohnWill

Retired Moderator
Joined
Oct 19, 2002
Messages
106,418
That's what I was trying to explain. When you connect the "Internet" port (or WAN port) of the wireless router to one of the switch port on the Linksys router, you block file sharing, because of the NAT layer in the second router.

Printing is the same as file sharing, as far as the connection of the two routers is concerned, it's still blocked.

I guess I fail to understand why it's a problem to connect it as I recommended. Obviously, you can still unplug it, reset it to factory defaults, and configure it for the new environment. You'll probably have to do some configuration anyway for a different environment, so I don't see the downside.
 

TerryNet

Moderator
Joined
Mar 23, 2005
Messages
80,272
First Name
Terry
JohnWill, thank you very much for the explanation. The blocking through the WAN port I should have been able to figure out for myself, but the fact that the secondary router will "pass through" the request for IP is new and interesting and useful information. Thanks again; I'm learning a lot from your various posts.
--------------------------------------
John Denow, sorry I confused things for awhile with my simplistic mistakes. JohnWill is correct--to get file or printer sharing your "plug and network" scheme will not work. Some reconfiguration will be needed and John's method is the easiest (and maybe only) way, but it will not be difficult after you and your son have done it once.

If you watch the ads you can find a sale and rebate offer that will get you a good wireless router with 4 ethernet ports for no more than $25 and a couple rebate submissions. Then you can use that at home, your son can leave his router at school/apartment, and easily connect at home without bringing his router with him.
 

JohnWill

Retired Moderator
Joined
Oct 19, 2002
Messages
106,418
When you wire them the way I suggested, you really aren't using the secondary router as a router, just as a switch with wireless capability. That's why the DHCP server from the primary router still assigns the addresses to devices on the secondary router. :)
 

John Denow

Thread Starter
Joined
Nov 20, 1999
Messages
189
JohnWill....

Concerning the following from your post..

"Connect from the primary router's LAN port to one of the LAN ports on the secondary router. If there is no uplink port and neither of the routers have auto-sensing ports, use a cross-over cable. Leave the WAN port unconnected"

Each router has an "internet" (input) port and 4 "outputs" (numbered 1,2,3,4). The Linksys also has an "uplink" port which is currently not in use. Do I understand correctly that I will not use the "internet" port on the Netgear Wireless router, but plug from an "output" port (1,2,3,or 4) on the Linksys to "output" (1,2,3,or 4) on the Netgear??

Or do I leave things connected as demonstrated in my previous reply(Linksys "4" to Netgear "Internet"), but disable the DCHP settings in the Netgear and change the IP address?

Thanks again for the clarification.
 

JohnWill

Retired Moderator
Joined
Oct 19, 2002
Messages
106,418
Yes, you'll run a patch cable from one of the Netgear LAN ports to the Uplink port on the Linksys. Note that the Uplink port "may" be shared with the port immediately next to it, it depends on the specific model. Sometimes you can only use the uplink port or the adjacent port, not both.

Basically, if you follow the configuration I posted, you should have a functional configuration with both routers connected.
 

John Denow

Thread Starter
Joined
Nov 20, 1999
Messages
189
I'll give it a try.

You are correct in regards to the uplink port of the Linksys. If that port is used, port "4" is deactivated.

Thanks again for the help
 
Status
This thread has been Locked and is not open to further replies. Please start a New Thread if you're having a similar issue. View our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 807,865 other people just like you!

Latest posts

Staff online

Top