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Wiring My House with Cat5. Which Wires to Use from DSL to Router?

Discussion in 'Networking' started by toasty_s, Feb 15, 2013.

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  1. toasty_s

    toasty_s Thread Starter

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    I'm running ethernet (cat5e) through my house and doing the actual wiring; this is the first time for me.
    I have the locations drilled and I'm all set to start running the cables. I need some advice on how to do the wiring from the DSL to the keystone to the router to the switch

    Here's the current setup, as AT&T originally wired the house:

    DSL --[cat5]--> Keystone --[cat5]--> AT&T_router -> wireless/ethernet.

    I noticed in the Cat5 that connects the DSL to the keystone in the house's interior, only 2 wires are used (the green and white/green I think) on the side that connects to the DSL, and the same two that connect to the keystone inside the house which then connects to the U-verse router. As far as I know it's a regular Cat5 that goes from the keystone to the router. With my new setup I'm going to move the router which will be connected to a switch before branching out to the rest of the house (wireless will no longer be used).

    Here's what I assume I should do....

    1) Use only 2 wires on the end for the Cat5 that connects to the DSL box outside the house.
    2) Use only 2 wires for the RJ45 jack that goes into the router's uplink port, inside the house (unlike the original configuration, there will be no keystone between the DSL and the router).
    3) Regular Cat5 wiring (T568B) from one of the router's ports connecting it to the switch.
    4) Regular Cat5 wiring (T568B) from the switch to the computers.

    It's points #2 and #3 that I'm mostly unsure about.

    Can anyone clear this up for me?
    Thanks a ton
     
  2. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    Typical home wiring for phone PSTN systems have 4 wires (2 pairs). Some may have 6 wires. The two inner pairs are for the primary phone circuit for the home. The outer pair is used if you paid for a second phone line service. Because phone systems were the first "network", the subsequent wiring standards of T568A or B were done in such a manner to be compatible with existing phone systems. So what this means is that if you wire your house with T568B, it doesn't matter whether you plug in a phone or a network device. The pin outs of the jack will support what ever you want to plug in to it. In my house, I have various rooms where I have some RJ45 jacks. I can provision those ports to be either LAN drops of phone drops by just switching the other end of the cable to either my switch or a patch panel for phone service. Yes, this means you can plug in an RJ11 jack into an RJ45 jack.
     
  3. toasty_s

    toasty_s Thread Starter

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    Feb 15, 2013
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    Wow, cool.

    So you're saying if I go ahead and ignore how the tech wired the current cable and keystone from the DSL; and I wire the ENTIRE house with T568B (including from the DSL to the router. Then not only will the internet work, but if I then decide to include a landline with the service I can technically connect the phone to any of the live RJ45 jacks and I'll have phone too?

    EDIT: Okay, so in the day time I popped open the panel for the DSL and found the two wires I'd previously spoken of. Apparently those are the only 2 wires from the cat5 that are wired at all (which currently connects to the interior keystone). From looking at the panel I'm not sure where the other 3-pair would go. Do they need to go anywhere?


    Box
    [​IMG]

    Cat5 to the interior keystone:
    [​IMG]

    The *only* 2 connecting wires between the DSL and keystone:
    [​IMG]
     
  4. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    Sorry for the late reply. From the Telco DMARC, that box you have in the picture, you would only have two wires connected as shown. These would be the middle pair of the RJ11/RJ45 jack...depending on how the other end was wired.

    In my home setup, I have a dedicated run where one end is wired into the box as you have and the other end is to an RJ11 jack which goes straight into the DSL modem. For the analog phone service, I have those wired separately to the DMARC box but all running off a single DSL filter.

    When I said jacks wired for T568A/B can support both Ethernet and phone service, there's a caveat. I have a patch panel for analog phone service which I can plug in jacks from the various drops I've wired into my house to convert those jacks to phone lines. If I don't want to use them as phone jacks, they get plugged into my network switch.

    One thing you have to be very careful of is if you have a jack purposed for phone service that you do not plug in an Ethernet device to this jack. The ring voltage phone phone services is 48V and will fry any LAN devices plugged into the jack if you receive a phone call.

    You can look in my profile and my gallery to see the patch panel I'm talking about on my wall rack. It's under the Panduit cable manager.
     
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