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writing to /usr

Discussion in 'Linux and Unix' started by trevor1, Feb 13, 2003.

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  1. trevor1

    trevor1 Thread Starter

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    Nov 3, 2002
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    well, is there anyway to do it? i need to because when i installed mdk 9 i made that partition way huge and made root and swap way small, need some space in the usr partition!!!
     
  2. lynch

    lynch

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    Aug 3, 2002
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    Hi,trevor1.What exactly are you trying to do?
    /usr is used mostly for programs installed by the user.Not that you couldnt write to it as root, as it is configured that way by default.
    It's a permissions thing,I think.
    Are you still using your same partition scheme? Why is / (root)made small?Or did you mean /boot?
    Can you write to /home ok?
    lynch
     
  3. trevor1

    trevor1 Thread Starter

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    No, my root is only 256 megabytes, i didnt know thats the main partition used for regular storage. i think my /usr partition is like 3gb. does /swap have to be big? i need the xtra space on my linux drive because i only have 13 mb of room left in /root!!!!
     
  4. lynch

    lynch

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    Ok,I see the problem you have.
    The file system hirearchy is like this:
    /=root.This is the directory under which all the other system directories should reside.Not to be confused with /root,which is the root user's home directory.
    These other directories should always be on the same partition as / :
    /bin
    /dev
    /etc
    /lib
    /mnt
    /proc
    /root-in theory you might be able to put this on a seperate partition but there's no good reason to.
    /sbin
    /tmp-see note after /root:)
    The other standard directories can reside on thier own partitions:
    /boot-with the size of hard drives being pretty big you can safely make this 100-250MB

    /opt-if this directory is on your / partition,it's probably why your almost out of space.It's where most commercial packages are installed.

    /usr-most user installed packages go here.

    /home-this depends on disk size and # of users,but should be large enough to hold just about everything you save offline and/or download from the 'net.

    /var-this can have it's own partition but I'd only consider that if the computer is being used as a server.

    the commonly suggested size of the swap partition is 2 x ram.If you have a large amount of ram,say 512MB or more, it could be half of that.

    I get by nicely with a 2 partition setup on my everyday box:
    swap=512MB
    / =19GB
    My other comps have a 250MB /boot partition but the 2 will suffice.If your Linux system spans 2 or more drives the advanced partitioning schemes come into play.
    I sure hope that helps:)
    lynch
     
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